Camera link base cameras offer image quality comparable to CCD-based cameras

Adimec’s Qs-4A40 and a Qs-2A80 cameras deliver performance of up to 170 fps with CCD-comparable quality through Adimec True Accurate Imaging technology.

04/21/2011


Adimec has made the Quartz Qs Series, initially featuring the Qs-4A40 and Qs-2A80 cameras. Both cameras leverage the Adimec True Accurate Imaging technique to deliver image quality comparable to CCD-based cameras, using CMOS-based sensor technology for improved speed. The cameras can deliver up to 170 frames per second (fps) performance (in 2 megapixel version; 90 fps in 4 megapixel version) with no sacrifices in image quality.

Based on the Adimec True Accurate Imaging technology, the cameras offer a range of quality-enhancing features. Advanced flat field correction (FFC) capabilities, even in color and with field calibration supported, deliver better image uniformity. The cameras deliver signal-to-noise improvements of up to 12 dB shot noise improvement compared to off-the-shelf CMOS sensor performance. The new cameras also offer an HDR mode for large scene dynamic capture capabilities.

All members of the Quartz Qs series are available with Camera Link base and deliver a new level of acquisition speed and quality in Camera Link base system architectures in the 2 and 4 megapixel resolution domain.

“These new small footprint, high-performance cameras address an important need in machine vision applications that require quality images at higher speeds in cost-effective infrastructure solutions. We have taken key characteristics of our popular OPAL series, such as Camera Link base support and small form factor, and applied them to the CMOS-performance advantages of our higher-end Quartz series with these two new products. The result is an absolute optimized imaging performance now available in just a simple Camera Link base environment. This offers a ‘best of both worlds’ scenario for system developers who need CMOS speed performance and accuracy typically only available with CCD,” said Marcel Dijkema, strategic product manager at Adimec.

The Qs-2A80 and Qs-4A40 deliver 2048 x 1088 running at 76 fps and 2048 x 2048 running at 40fps, respectively. In burst mode, the cameras deliver 170 fps and 90 fps respectively, a 2x improvement over any other Camera Link base camera. The buffering capability in the cameras also eliminates the need for more costly infrastructure when operating at high speeds and provides the freedom to optimize on Field Of View, Speed and Shot Noise performance (up to 12 dB improvements). Multiple FFC sets are supported and stored in the camera and can be field calibrated by the onboard calibration routine. This opens up new possibilities to derive exactly the image needed under various conditions with just a single camera.

Qs-4A40 and Qs-2A80 cameras are available in monochrome or color models, and both offer optional near infrared (NIR) capabilities. Solutions with anti-reflection coatings are supported to maximize the application performance.

Quartz cameras use a variety of techniques to derive optimal performance, quality and features from standard components, the company said. The cameras do not alter the scene contents due to internal imperfections. This allows the images provided by the camera to enable the best measurement results.

www.adimec.com

Adimec Advanced Image Systems

See also www.controleng.com/machinevision.

- Edited by Gust Gianos, Control Engineering, www.controleng.com



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