Compact laser scanner delivers flexible safety solution

Small size, light weight, low power consumption, and innovative features combine to deliver a simple, flexible safety solution. Omron Scientific Technologies OS32C Safety Laser Scanner has a 104.5 mm profile, light 1.3 kg weight, and low 5 W power consumption (3.75 W in standby mode).

10/14/2010


Omron Scientific Technologies Inc. introduces what it is calling the world’s most compact Type 3 safety laser scanner. The OS32C Safety Laser Scanner has a 104.5 mm profile, light 1.3 kg weight and low 5 W power consumption (3.75 W in standby mode). Combined with highly flexible and easily configurable detection zones, the OS32C is easy to handle and install while solving diverse presence detection and collision avoidance application needs. Designed to deliver value and versatility in both OEM and retrofit machine safety and AGV collision avoidance applications, the OS32C also delivers faster and easier equipment commissioning and troubleshooting with Patented Individual Sector Indicators, and system monitoring over LAN via the integrated Ethernet port.

The unit reportedly has up to 4 times faster mean time to repair (MTTR) than other safety laser scanners. It also uses a unique memory module that lets a maintenance technician get the manufacturing line running again without using a computer.

According to the company, the OS32C is the first to provide integrated management via Ethernet, which helps keep machines running by allowing the user to check the operating state and analyze the cause of an emergency stop via local area network. The OS32C’s status display and eight patented Individual Sector Indicators also enable users to determine at a glance the unit’s operating state and error codes, and assess the direction of an intrusion.

The scanner features a 270° detection angle that enables a single scanner to provide presence detection, including two warning zones and one safety zone, on two sides of a machine. Its small size also means that it can even be used inside a machine. Installed vertically, the OS32C serves as a complete intrusion detection solution. The unit’s innovative Reference Boundary Monitoring function constantly monitors reference points and turns off the safety outputs when a shift in its physical position is detected. This prevents unauthorized mounting modifications to the laser scanner.

The OS32C Safety Laser Scanner is also a robust and flexible collision avoidance solution that can provide front/rear monitoring, or 270° monitoring, in AGV applications. Its light weight and compact body make it easy to install, and its low power consumption minimizes battery load. For complex AGV tracks, up to 70 zone set combinations can be set, each with one safety zone of up to 3 m and two warning zones of up to 10 m. The two warning zones can be set to support various purposes, such as warning sound and speed control.

Users can tailor the OS32C to a specific application by specifying at time of order whether the power and Ethernet connections are on the back or left side of the scanner. Once installed, users can adjust the unit’s response time from 80 ms to 680 ms to prevent erroneous machine stoppages caused by environmental pollutants. Additionally, users can configure the safety and warning zones with the OS32C’s configuration software and a PC and, because each safety laser scanner’s configuration is stored in the I/O block, it can quickly be replaced if damaged, with no reprogramming needed.

Omron STI is based in Fremont, CA.

www.sti.com

http://www.omron-ap.co.in/news_updates/main.asp

Omron STI

- Also read:

Machine Safety Blog


- Edited by Renee R. Bassett for Control Engineering, www.controleng.com



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