10 benefits of Common Industrial Protocol networks, according to ODVA

End-users, vendors, and other proponents of the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) continue discussions about CIP features and benefits, at the 2009 CIP Networks Conference & 13th Annual Meeting, Feb. 24-26. CIP runs EtherNet/IP, DeviceNet, CompoNet, and ControlNet. The 10 benefits are...

02/25/2009


Howey-in-the-Hills, FL – End-users, vendors, and other proponents of the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) continue discussions today and tomorrow about CIP features and benefits, at the 2009 CIP Networks Conference & 13th Annual Meeting, Feb. 24-26.
- Graphic shows how the CIP family of protocols works together .
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Testing, time-based control help CIP based networks; ODVA meets Feb. 24-26

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ODVA is the guiding organization for the CIP and accompanying industrial networks, EtherNet/IP (an Ethernet protocol), DeviceNet, CompoNet, and ControlNet.
10 benefits
ODVA says that CIP:
1. Encompasses a suite of messages and services for the collection of manufacturing automation applications—control, safety, synchronization, motion, configuration and information.
2 . Allows users to integrate these manufacturing applications with enterprise-level Ethernet networks and the Internet.
3 . Is supported by hundreds of vendors around the world and is truly media-independent.
4 . Provides users with a unified communication architecture throughout the manufacturing enterprise.
5 . Allows users to benefit today from the many advantages of open networks while protecting their existing automation investments when upgrading in the future.
6 . Enables coherent integration of control, motion and synchronization, configuration and diagnostics, and safety information.
7 . Provides seamless bridging and routing without the added cost and complexity of bridges and proxies.
8 . Gives freedom to deploy interoperable, multivendor systems, allowing users to choose best-of-breed products, with the assurance of competitive prices and low integration cost.
9 . Delivers one, media independent protocol for all Network adaptations of CIP — EtherNet/IP, DeviceNet, CompoNet, and ControlNet — allowing users to choose the best network or networks for their application while still minimizing their overall investment in system engineering, installation, integration, and commissioning.
10 . Integrates support of Modbus server devices into the CIP architectures with Modbus translation services for originator devices on CIP; allows devices supporting Modbus TCP and EtherNet/IP to reside on the same TCP/IP network — or in the same device.
– Edited by Mark T. Hoske , editor in chief
Control Engineering News Desk
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