Engineering, integration company expands in Davenport


PCT Engineered Systems LLC is excited to announce plans for a new 40,000 ft sq facility in the Eastern Iowa Industrial Center (EIIC) in northwest Davenport. The facility will support the continued growth in providing engineering and manufacturing services with expertise in control system integration, drive system applications, custom machine fabrication, combustion systems, and plant floor IT applications. PCT is also the manufacturer of BroadBeam electron beam processors.

Terry Thompson, president of PCT.

Total project investment is estimated at $8.8 million. Plans also call for creation of 41 new jobs over the next three years, at an average wage of $43,900. Financial support for the project is currently being sought from the State of Iowa and the City of Davenport. Other support is being requested from the Bi-State Revolving Loan Fund, Eastern Iowa Community College District Iowa New Jobs Training Program, and the Greater Davenport Redevelopment Corp. PCT has selected Ryan Companies U.S. Inc. as the general contractor for this project.

“PCT has called the Quad Cities home for our entire 20 year history,” states Terry Thompson, president of PCT. “Our choice to continue our growth in Davenport was made in the best interests of our staff and in recognition of the ease of access to Interstate 80 for transportation of our products.”

Thompson says besides expansion of system integration and manufacturing services, company growth also has been fueled by acquisition of the BroadBeam line of electron beam processors, originally manufactured in California. Presently, 62% of materials PCT uses are sourced locally.

Examples of products made with electron beam technology include shrink-wrap film, adhesive tape, orange juice cartons, ice cream containers, and laminate furniture. Electron beam processing provides important environmental benefits to manufacturers. The process is very energy efficient. Special 100% solids inks and coatings used contain no solvents; therefore no volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are produced.

—Edited by Mark T. Hoske , Control Engineering editor in chief