Toyota, Denso, and Dupont awarded for plant-derived resin development

Society of Plastics Engineers recognize eco-friendly resin used in Toyota Camry radiators.

11/24/2009


Toyotaand its partners Denso and DuPont Automotive have been recognized for the plant-derivedresin radiator end tank, which is used in some 2009 Toyota Camrys.The Societyof Plastics Engineers (SPE) Automotive Division awarded the companies with its "MostInnovative Use of Plastics" award in the Environment Category.

"The radiator tank--which has ahigh percent of renewable material--is one of the first to be used in amechanical under-the-hood component exposed to a hot, chemically aggressiveenvironment," said Doug Patton, senior vice president of Engineering at DensoInternational America.

The eco-friendly polymer--DuPont Zytel RS nylon--isproduced by a chemical reaction between organic compounds derived from thecastor plant and petroleum. Additives, including glass fiber and others areincorporated to produce the resultant eco-friendly resin, which Denso jointlydeveloped with DuPont Automotive. About 40% of the resin is comprised of theplant-based ingredients.

Beyond the radiator tank's environmentally friendlymaterials, it is said to release less CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere duringits life cycle than the conventional product. This can partially be attributedto the fact that Zytel RS is extracted from plants, which absorb CO 2 through thephotosynthesis process. Also, because less petroleum is used to produce the endtank, the new product also helps conserve oil.

"Through collaboration, we were able todevelop a new material for use in a higher performance radiator end tank thatmeets auto manufacturer's needs for sustainable solutions," said PatrickFerronato, global director, development and marketing, DuPont AutomotivePerformance Polymers. "The plant-derived resin also meets requirements forexceptional heat resistance, durability and road salt resistance."

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