CC-Link IE: First, open, industrial Gigabit Ethernet protocol

CC-Link Partner Association (CLPA) announced a Gigabit industrial Ethernet (IE) protocol, CC-Link IE, allowing network communications at near backplane speeds. The organization calls it the first open standard, 1 Gigabit per second (1 Gbps) manufacturing network to be released globally.

10/24/2007


 

CC-Link Partner Association (CLPA, Tokyo, Japan) announced a Gigabit industrial Ethernet (IE) protocol, CC-Link IE, allowing network communications at near backplane speeds. The organization calls it the first open standard, 1 Gigabit per second (1 Gbps) manufacturing network to be released globally.

The network uses standard Ethernet IEEE 802.3z multimode fiber-optic cable in dual loop topology. Determinism is assured with network common memory without added hubs or switches, CPLA says.

CC-Link IE also has:
-Token-passing collision avoidance;
-256k bytes network common memory;
-120 stations per network capability;
-550 m maximum cable length between two stations; and
-Ability to handle 239 interconnected networks.

Other protocols in the family are CC-Link, which can connect controllers, and CC-Link/LT, for smaller devices; field and motion protocols are planned, the organization says. Core technology was donated by Mitsubishi Electric Automation (as Rockwell Automation originally did with DeviceNet). That could make the protocol especially attractive for those with Mitsubishi PLCs or other equipment that can communicate with this now open protocol. Mitsubishi says it makes more PLCs than any manufacturer.

ARC Advisory Group suggests that the introduction will build on a strong CC-Link base

of applications, especially in liquid crystal manufacturing, automotive, and other high tech manufacturing.

For information about other Ethernet protocols used in industrial settings (Profinet and EtherNet/IP are 100 MB industrial Ethernet protocols), read Product Research from Control Engineering :

Industrial Ethernet Protocols: Survey results show who's winning and why

Mark T. Hoske , editor in chief
Control Engineering News Desk
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