ABB enables shore-to-ship power in Gothenburg to reduce local emissions

During 10 hours in port, one cruise ship’s diesel generators ship can burn 20 metric tons of fuel and produce 60 tons of carbon dioxide, equivalent to annual emissions of 25 average-sized European cars. ABB electrical infrastructure will mitigate these emissions.

06/23/2010


ABB, Processkontroll Elektriska, and the Strena Line will reduce emissions at the Swedish port of Gothenburg by providing local electrical power to cruise ships.Port authorities and ship owners, spurred by emerging legislation in many parts of the world, seek ways to reduce emissions as part of the global effort to mitigate climate impact. ABB, provider of power and automation technology, will collaborate with Processkontroll Elektriska to provide a substation and necessary infrastructure to supply electrical power to a large number of Stena Line vessels using the Swedish port of Gothenburg. The new installation will be jointly owned by Stena Line and the port of Gothenburg.

ABB design, engineer, supply, and commission the shore-side substation, which will supply vessels with 3 MVA, 11 kV power. It will be the biggest installation of its kind, capable of providing power at both 50 Hz and 60 Hz, according to ABB. Equipment will include power transformers, frequency converters, medium-voltage switchgear and monitoring and safety equipment. The project is scheduled for completion in 2010.

Engineering investment improves local air quality

During a 10-hour stay in port, the diesel generators of a single cruise ship can burn 20 metric tons of fuel and produce 60 tons of carbon dioxide. This is equivalent to the total annual emissions of 25 average-sized European cars. Emissions can be mitigated by supplying the ship’s infrastructure with onshore power.

Use of shore-to-ship power in preference to onboard diesel generators also helps mitigate sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate emissions. It also reduces low-frequency noise and vibrations and allows maintenance of diesel engines while the ship is at berth.

“ABB is uniquely positioned to offer customers turnkey shore-to-ship power solutions by combining its shore-side power offering with onboard products and systems,” said Oleg Aleinikov, head of ABB’s substations business. “Our wide offering in both power and automation enables us to deliver optimized solutions to port authorities, ship owners and power utilities.”

ABB provides electrical infrastructure onshore and onboard installations required for shore-to-ship power supplies. This includes system components such as frequency converters, high- and medium-voltage switchgear, transformers, and control and protection systems. ABB also provides integrated systems and services ranging from the main incoming substation to retrofitting vessels’ electrical systems to receive shore-based power.

Prior ABB work in Gothenburg

ABB delivered the world’s first shore-to-ship power supply to the port of Gothenburg in 2000, and in 2004, the port received the ”Clean Marine Award” for environmental responsibility from the European Union, for reducing in-port emissions of noise and airborne pollutants.

ABB, based in Zurich, Switzerland, says it is a leader in power and automation technologies that enable utility and industry customers to improve their performance while lowering environmental impact. The ABB Group of companies operates in around 100 countries and employs about 117,000 people, the company said, in a June 23, 2010, announcement.

www.abb.com

See Control Engineering channels on sustainable engineering and on process control.

- Edited by Mark T. Hoske, Control Engineering content strategist, www.controleng.com



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