I'm having a ball at work

Think Again: Does that mean you are wearing a ball and chain, are juggling many things, or are having fun? See video summary of advice from Ted Garnett, president, Performance Resources Consulting, from the 2013 CSIA Executive Conference.

06/07/2013

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Tossing a flying disk prior to his presentation, Ted Garnett president, Performance Resources Consulting, helped those at the 2013 CSIA Executive Conference have fun, before and during his presentation, while teaching about a high-performance culture alonIf you want something done, give it to a busy person. Truisms have truth in them, and results-oriented consulting derives from the core of this saying. Busy people often have an internalized system of accountability, methods for organizing, and the follow-through to get many things done, having fun along the way.

SPEED Metrics was the title of Ted Garnett’s session at the Control System Integrator Association (CSIA) Executive Conference in May. Garnett, president, Performance Resources Consulting, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, explained that SPEED stands for structure, productivity, engagement, execution, and dependability (or due diligence). Examples follow.

He started the session by challenging each person attending any meeting to teach the team, upon return, at least one thing of value from the meeting or, better yet, one thing from each session.

Follow-through importance

Researchers took two groups and asked each to write 100 life goals. One of the groups also was asked to practice various accountability techniques: track them, make plans, and tell others in their lives. Over time, the group asked to be accountable was 27% more likely to achieve the goals than was the group who were asked only to make the list.

One of Garnett’s college roommates garnered laughter upon sharing, “I’m going to be an NFL quarterback.” All the decisions and trade-offs aligned thereafter, until Kurt Warner got it done... and was named to four Pro Bowls, played for three NFL teams, and went to three Super Bowls, winning one.

“In your family, community, neighborhood, and company, are you doing what it takes to achieve your NFL goal?” Leadership is a verb, not a position. The mission to get things done starts at the top, and having a performance culture can help get that done.

One gauge of a performance culture is to do a rough measure of how your teams are having a ball at work: Ball and chain, juggling many balls, and life is great? What percentage of each do you have? (40-40-20% or 20-60-20%?) The goal is to get zero in the first “red” area. A high-performance cultural chain of impact results: Satisfied employees lead to satisfied customers, leading to satisfying business profits, time, cost, and quality.

How many on your team say: “What a stupid weekend. I cannot wait for Monday?" How can you change culture to get the performance needed?

On the next page, see more advice, including getting the right results and time management.


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