Wi-fi wireless sensor system

The W-series wireless transmitters are designed to measure analog voltage and current, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure.

11/11/2011


The W-series wireless transmitters are designed to measure analog voltage and current, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure. Courtesy: Omega EngineeringThe Omega wSeries transmitters communicate on a standard Wi-Fi network and offers Wi-Fi transmitters for analog voltage and current, temperature from digital sensors and dual thermocouples, humidity, and barometric pressure.

The Wi-Fi transmitters are powered by batteries or ac. The battery version comes with two ordinary alkaline C-cell batteries that can last for 2 years depending on the frequency of readings. The ac version comes with a universal ac adaptor that operates on any voltage worldwide (110 to 240 V ac) and also includes an alkaline AA backup battery.

The wSeries Wi-Fi transmitters are designed for demanding industrial applications and harsh outdoor environments. The electronics are protected in a rugged weatherproof, polycarbonate NEMA 4 (IP65) rated housing.

The wSeries wireless sensor system can trigger an alarm if variables go above or below a set point that you determine. You can even set alarms to be notified by email. Alarms can be sent to a single user or to a group distribution list, including text messages to cell phones.

The wSeries system serves active web pages to display real time readings and charts of analog voltage and current, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. You can also log data in standard data formats for use in a spreadsheet or data acquisition program such as Excel or Visual Basic.

Chart scales are also adjustable. For example, the chart can display one minute, one hour, one day, one week, one month or one year. Temperature and humidity can be charted across the full span (-40 to 125 C, and 0 to 100% RH) or within any narrow range such as (20 to 30 C).

www.omega.com 

Omega Engineering

- Edited by Chris Vavra, Control Engineering, www.controleng.com 

See the Control Engineering collection of wireless articles at www.controleng.com/wireless.