HMIs: Display wall technology brings flat panel LCDs to small control rooms

Mitsubishi Digital Electronics delivers super narrow bezel LCD displays. This human machine interface for the control room has a 46-in. diagonal screen and is designed for applications that need the robustness of a video wall without the expense or required real estate, Mitsubishi says.

02/03/2010


Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America's Presentation Products Division announced an addition to its SeventySeries display wall product line. This human machine interface for control room applications has a 46-in. diagonal screen. Mitsubishi SeventySeries: FLAT is designed for applications that need the robustness of a video wall without the expense or required real estate, the company says.

Mitsubishi 70Series Flat Panel LCD in control room
"Sometimes smaller command and control centers that operate less than 24/7 need a‘lite' version of DLP video wall cube systems," said Matt Krstulja, director of sales, Datawall, Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America's Presentation Products Division.

The super-narrow bezel LCD panel is designed for smaller control rooms, transportation management centers, and security operation centers. Mitsubishi leveraged its sophisticated display wall technology and control room experience to create LCD flat panels that are more than simple digital signage displays. These feature hardware, firmware and software typically found in its sophisticated display walls developed for 24/7 environments, including a native resolution of 1366 x 168 pixels and 46-in. diagonal screen.

Each display has three input card slots and is completely accessible from the front using an optional wall mount, so the entire configuration can be flush against a wall with no clearance needed behind it. Routine maintenance can be performed to any display within any given configuration without removing adjacent panels.

Mitsubishi 70Series Flat Panel LCD screen
Features appropriate for command and control centers include 7.4 mm total mullion (screen to screen gap), and a unique three-axis motorized mount for precise pixel-to-pixel adjustment, so critical information remains across the screen and text and images line up seamlessly. SeventySeries: FLAT panels also automatically compensate for a video source image while leaving mapping/network sources intact with its Input-Specific Bezel Compensation feature. Overall images maintain correct proportions across video or mapping, and all relevant information can be displayed from any input source.

With its built-in hardware, a SeventySeries: FLAT panel functions as a command center display hub by incorporating built-in windowing of up to six sources (such as computers, security/traffic cameras, etc.) per display Additionally, daisy chain input cards can be used to enable windows to move freely over the entire video wall.

Mitsubishi's SeventySeries: FLAT "Smart Switch" function delivers the signal redundancy required for mission critical applications. If a signal is unexpectedly lost, the LCD panel automatically switches to an alternative signal source within seconds. This function allows users to minimize downtime, also saving time and resources.

Because each LCD panel has its own color and brightness signature, it is important to balance and unify each to achieve consistency across the wall. SeventySeries: FLAT panels have an innovative digital Color Space Control function that blends and adjusts colors automatically, while its Digital Gradation Circuit distributes brightness uniformly across the screen. These two technologies ensure brightly lit, richly colored image reproduction evenly and consistently from edge to edge, across multi-screen SeventySeries: FLAT wall configurations.

"We've listened to our systems integrators and end-users, and we have worked closely with our developers and engineers to create these new SeventySeries: FLAT panels ," said Krstulja.

- Edited by Renee Robbins, senior editor
Control Engineering News Desk
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Mitsubishi video wall dynamic bright video

Dynamic Brightness Balancing. Each Seventy Series display wall cube is equipped with three built-in sensors (one for each primary color) and Dynamic Color & Brightness Balancing system embedded. Built-in sensors continually monitor the individual red, green and blue outputs of each cube, sharing this data with its neighbors and adjusting performance automatically to maintain an extremely accurate color balance over the entire video wall. See video for a demonstration.

 

Mitsubishi video wall true front access

 

Front Access for Maintenance. With the specially designed slide & lift screen structure and the self air ventilation system, all the installation and maintenance work can be done from the front. This means that no space behind the display wall cube is needed even it is tiled as a display wall, so video walls can be installed against the wall. See video for a complete demonstration.

 





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