ISO 13849-1 Machine Guarding adoption, part 2

The scope statement in the machine guarding standard reads, “This part of ISO 13849 provides safety requirements and guidance on the principles for the design and integration of safety-related parts of control systems (SRP/CS), including the design of software. For these parts of SRP/CS, it specifies characteristics that include the performance level required for carrying out safety functions. It applies to SRP/CS, regardless of the type of technology and energy used (electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, etc.), for all kinds of machinery.” Good stuff, right? At the end of December 2011 EN 954-1; 1996 can no longer be used to demonstrate conformity.

08/24/2011


April 2011 Control Engineering cover story on machine safety show results of a Control Engineering-VDC Research survey showed that well over half the respondents will or may need help to comply with the year-end 2011 machine guarding directive.The scope statement in this standard reads, “This part of ISO 13849 provides safety requirements and guidance on the principles for the design and integration of safety-related parts of control systems (SRP/CS), including the design of software. For these parts of SRP/CS, it specifies characteristics that include the performance level required for carrying out safety functions. It applies to SRP/CS, regardless of the type of technology and energy used (electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, etc.), for all kinds of machinery.” Good stuff, right?

   And, according to the European Machinery Directive, at the end of December 2011 EN 954-1; 1996 will be withdrawn and can no longer be used to demonstrate conformity.

 JB Titus, CFSE  Over the last 15 years EN 954-1 did a great job of helping OEMs, systems integrators, and end users understand categories of hazards and the importance of mitigating those hazards to acceptable levels and improve overall safety. Also, over the last fifteen years automation suppliers have stepped to the plate bringing a lot of new products to market designed, tested and certified for safety applications. Many of these new products are hardware and software based offering complicated new sources of possible failures and potential hazards. In my opinion, this transition in innovation for safety technology to a large part has driven the need for a quantitative approach to evaluate the performance level of safety circuits and to include the evaluation of software. Specifically, the level of diagnostics included in the software.

   The system designers from the OEM’s and systems integrators will use EN ISO 13849-1 and the quantitative analysis of the safety circuits to determine the performance levels to achieve required safety functions during the design phase. This gives the designers the flexibility to modify the design in order to meet the acceptable hazard levels determined in the risk assessment. So, life is good – right?

   Well, in my mind the transition for the end user is a little bit different. Under the qualitative approach of EN 954-1 the OEM, systems integrator, and end user all likely had the competencies to demonstrate conformance. Under EN ISO 13849-1 do all of the end users have the competencies to demonstrate conformance when compared to the system designers of the OEM’s and systems integrators? Only you can answer this question. According to a Control Engineering survey via Webex in April of this year respondents were asked if they needed outside help or tools in order to meet the compliance requirements. A full 38% indicated they needed help and 42% indicated maybe or unsure!(See pie graph, above.)

   I’m not sure how many of these respondents were end users, but we’d sure like to know your opinions, questions, or experiences and what you can add to this discussion?

   Your comments or suggestion are always welcome so please let us know your thoughts. Submit your ideas, experiences, and challenges on this subject in the comments section below. Click on the following text if you don't see a comments box, then scroll down: ISO 13849-1 Machine Guarding Adoption, Part 2.

   Did you see the Safety Integration Webcast?

   Related articles:

ISO 13849-1 Machine Guarding adoption, Part 1

EN ISO 13849-1; 2008 – Are We Ready By December 2011?

Cover story: Machine Safety Integration

Trouble Implementing ISO 13849-1; 2006 per the European Machinery Directive

   Contact: www.jbtitus.com for “Solutions for Machine Safety”.



No comments
The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by...
The System Integrator Giants program lists the top 100 system integrators among companies listed in CFE Media's Global System Integrator Database.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
This eGuide illustrates solutions, applications and benefits of machine vision systems.
Learn how to increase device reliability in harsh environments and decrease unplanned system downtime.
This eGuide contains a series of articles and videos that considers theoretical and practical; immediate needs and a look into the future.
Mobile HMI; PID tuning tips; Mechatronics; Intelligent project management; Cybersecurity in Russia; Engineering education; Road to IANA
Save energy with automation; Process control system upgrades; Dispelling controll myths; Time-sensitive networking; Control system integration; Road to IANA
Additive manufacturing advancements; Machine vision enhances robotics; Fieldbus evolution; Process safety; Advice from System Integrators of the Year; Road to IANA
This article collection contains several articles on the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and how it is transforming manufacturing.

Find and connect with the most suitable service provider for your unique application. Start searching the Global System Integrator Database Now!

Flexible offshore fire protection; Big Data's impact on operations; Bridging the skills gap; Identifying security risks
The digital oilfield: Utilizing Big Data can yield big savings; Virtualization a real solution; Tracking SIS performance
Getting to the bottom of subsea repairs: Older pipelines need more attention, and operators need a repair strategy; OTC preview; Offshore production difficult - and crucial

(copy 5)

click me