Product Exclusive: Powerfoil X2.0

New industrial ceiling fan from the Big Ass Fan Company uses an airfoil system that is designed to increase overall coverage.

05/01/2012


The Powerfoil X2.0 from the Big Ass Fan Company uses an airfoil system that is designed to reduce overall coverage. Courtesy: Big Ass FansPowerfoil X2.0, the newest industrial fan from the Big Ass Fan Company of Lexington, Ky., significantly increases the coverage area and warranty of the company’s popular Powerfoil X.

Released on May 1, 2012, the Powerfoil X2.0 introduces a unique new patented airfoil system — a system that combines patented airfoils and winglets with patent-pending AirFence technology to increase overall coverage by 28%.

The winglet improves airfoil effectiveness by eliminating efficiency-robbing turbulence at the tip, while the AirFence captures air that would otherwise slip off the end of the airfoil. The winglet’s new “cuffed” shape allows it to fit snugly into the new airfoil, resulting in improved efficiency and reduced wind noise.

The 8- to 24-ft. diameter Powerfoil X2.0 was developed by a team of engineers in the Big Ass Fan Company’s custom-built research and development facility, the only facility of its kind in the world. This thorough testing and a host of durability enhancements led the company to offer a nonprorated 15-year warranty on the new Powerfoil X2.0.

The fan also comes with an optional washdown package, featuring a stainless steel, washdown motor to withstand frequent intense cleaning. The overall non-pooling design of Powerfoil X2.0 utilizes nonporous, nonabsorbent and corrosion-resistant materials throughout, making it a resilient air-movement machine for any processing environment.

Other new features include a streamlined key pad interface, 150 feet of pre-assembled CAT 5 cable and an IP55-rated, fully covered, variable frequency drive enclosure. Certain tried-and-true features of the Powerfoil X remain, including the NitroSeal gearbox from gearing industry pioneers Stöber Ltd.

“A better gearbox simply means a longer life,” said engineering manager Rick Oleson. “Incorporating top-of-the-line parts leads to a finer finish, and fit of gears results in quieter, cooler operation as well as improved energy efficiency.”

In warmer months, Big Ass Fans improve occupant comfort through increased air movement. With the fans operating at 60% to full speed, the additional air movement creates a cooling sensation that can make occupants feel up to 10 F cooler. Employee comfort also results in greater productivity and less turnover.

Large diameter, low speed ceiling fans can also be used to destratify heat by moving large volumes of air without creating a draft. The energy savings achieved from reducing the amount of heat escaping through the roof is similar to turning the thermostat down three to five degrees, which can also translate to a significant reduction in operating costs.

Powerfoil X2.0 is one of several new products coming to the market this year from the Big Ass Fan Company, a privately-held American company that retained all its employees through the recent economic slowdown to emerge stronger than ever. Other industrial ceiling fan models now available include the Powerfoil 8, which utilizes the technology and proven components of the new Powerfoil X2.0 at an intermediate price point, and the Basic 6, an entry-level fan.

New misting options for the portable AirGo and Yellow Jacket fans bring the same cooling effect as tons of air conditioning exactly where it’s needed. 



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