Robust reliability and maintainability process reduces costs

A more robust and understood reliability and maintainability process can reduce costs and improve competitiveness in companies of all types. With only 38% of companies doing business using RandM specifications, it’s a good indication of how much these methodologies are actually being used. As shown in Fig.

07/01/2009


A more robust and understood reliability and maintainability process can reduce costs and improve competitiveness in companies of all types. With only 38% of companies doing business using RandM specifications, it’s a good indication of how much these methodologies are actually being used. As shown in Fig. 1, increasing levels of RandM resulted in lower maintenance expenditures. Each point represents the average for all North American companies that responded in that RandM level.

Also, North American companies that had more production operator PM involvement had reduced maintenance costs. Each point in Fig. 2 represents the average for all North American companies that responded in that level of production operator PM involvement.

Changes are coming

All of the company responses were categorized into the six most frequently mentioned areas. The five most representative items for each of the six R and M areas was also compiled.

People and cultural improvements (26%)

  • Improve the culture (management, operator, maintenance)

  • More production operator involvement

  • Hire full-time reliability and maintainability engineers

  • Training (RCM, cross-training, R & M)

  • More involvement by all employees

    • More design-in reliability and maintainability (20%)

      • More design-in reliability and maintainability

      • Standardized components on equipment

      • Standardized controls architecture

      • Component reliability improvements

      • Better use of R & M in decision-making

        • More data-driven processes and tools (19%)

          • Better use of predictive tools

          • Better use of data to drive KPIs

          • Better data on the lifespan of critical components

          • Improve OEE

          • Better integration of SPC and R & M metrics

            • Maintenance process improvements (16%)

              • Implement full TPM process

              • Dedicated resources for R & M tasks

              • Better CMMS use and capability

              • Less reactive maintenance

              • More timely repairs

                • Specific maintenance improvements (13%)

                  • Better inventory/spare parts control

                  • Better lubrication program

                  • More kaizen events

                  • More reliable electrical/electronics

                  • Better system components (i.e., water quality)

                    • Better sensors and timely feedback (6%)

                      • More machine self-monitoring/feedback

                      • More/better error-proofing

                      • Improved sensors and data acquisition

                      • More equipment troubleshooting/diagnostics

                      • More real-time feedback/corrections

                        • Most important maintenance metrics %%MDASSML%% All of the company responses were categorized into the five most frequently mentioned areas. Again, the five most representative items for each of the five metric areas were also compiled.

                          Performance (30%)

                          • MTTR

                          • MTBF

                          • OEE

                            • Critical equipment uptime %, equipment availability %

                              • Maintenance Downtime %

                              • Schedule Compliance (16%)

                              • % PM compliance

                              • % Predictive Maintenance compliance

                              • % PM compliance on critical equipment

                              • % PM work order compliance

                              • % Backlog

                              • Cost (14%)

                              • Maintenance cost/unit produced

                                • Maintenance cost/replacement asset value

                                  • Maintenance cost/sales

                                  • Cost of repairs

                                  • % Budget Compliance

                                    • Maintenance Type (12%)

                                      • % Preventive

                                      • % Predictive

                                      • % Reactive

                                      • Proactive/reactive ratio

                                      • % Corrective repairs from PMs

                                        • Miscellaneous (28%)

                                          • % Lubrication performed

                                          • Pareto analysis of failures, top 10 downtime reasons

                                          • Spare parts usage

                                          • Customer Satisfaction

                                          • Tool Life.

                                            • Additional Findings:

                                              • “Perceived world class’’ maintenance expenditure/original machinery and equipment investment is highest at 12.3% in small companies (less than 100 employees) and lowest in large companies (more than 1,000 employees) at 5.4%

                                              • “Actual” maintenance expenditure/original machinery and equipment investment is highest at 12.5% in small companies (less than 100 employees) and lower in larger companies (7.8% in medium size companies with 101-1000 employees and 8.6% in companies with more than 1000 employees)

                                              • In response to “What has positively impacted maintenance in the last five years?,” large and medium size companies selected “Better management understanding of maintainability/reliability” as the most significant. Small companies selected “More reliable machinery and equipment” as being most helpful

                                              • The largest opportunity was identified as both, “Better technology available” and “More designed-in maintainability” for small companies. Medium and large companies had “More involvement by operators” as their greatest opportunity. Also compared was “Maintenance expenditure/original machinery and equipment investment (%),” for companies that rated the impact of “Better management understanding of maintenance/reliability over the last five years” as high. These companies, on average, performed about 10% better than the 2008 North American average of 9.7% maintenance expenditure/original machinery and equipment investment

                                              • “Production operators performing PM checks or repairs” was 44.7% for small companies, 43.4% for medium size companies and 18.1% for large companies.

                                                • In summary, a robust reliability and maintainability process can result in significant operational improvements and cost reductions.

                                                  A copy of this and additional information can be obtained at the University of Tennessee %%MDASSML%% Reliability and Maintainability Center Website at the end of July by going to www.engr.utk.edu/mrc .





No comments
The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by...
Each year, a panel of Control Engineering editors and industry expert judges select the System Integrator of the Year Award winners.
Control Engineering Leaders Under 40 identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
Learn more about methods used to ensure that the integration between the safety system and the process control...
Adding industrial toughness and reliability to Ethernet eGuide
Technological advances like multiple-in-multiple-out (MIMO) transmitting and receiving
Virtualization advice: 4 ways splitting servers can help manufacturing; Efficient motion controls; Fill the brain drain; Learn from the HART Plant of the Year
Two sides to process safety: Combining human and technical factors in your program; Preparing HMI graphics for migrations; Mechatronics and safety; Engineers' Choice Awards
Detecting security breaches: Forensic invenstigations depend on knowing your networks inside and out; Wireless workers; Opening robotic control; Product exclusive: Robust encoders
The Ask Control Engineering blog covers all aspects of automation, including motors, drives, sensors, motion control, machine control, and embedded systems.
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
News and comments from Control Engineering process industries editor, Peter Welander.
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
This is a blog from the trenches – written by engineers who are implementing and upgrading control systems every day across every industry.
Anthony Baker is a fictitious aggregation of experts from Callisto Integration, providing manufacturing consulting and systems integration.
Integrator Guide

Integrator Guide

Search the online Automation Integrator Guide
 

Create New Listing

Visit the System Integrators page to view past winners of Control Engineering's System Integrator of the Year Award and learn how to enter the competition. You will also find more information on system integrators and Control System Integrators Association.

Case Study Database

Case Study Database

Get more exposure for your case study by uploading it to the Control Engineering case study database, where end-users can identify relevant solutions and explore what the experts are doing to effectively implement a variety of technology and productivity related projects.

These case studies provide examples of how knowledgeable solution providers have used technology, processes and people to create effective and successful implementations in real-world situations. Case studies can be completed by filling out a simple online form where you can outline the project title, abstract, and full story in 1500 words or less; upload photos, videos and a logo.

Click here to visit the Case Study Database and upload your case study.