Specifying fire, life safety systems for new, existing office buildings

Office buildings might seem like simple structures from the outside, but engineers engaged in such projects know they can be highly complex, with specialized fire/life safety requirements, laboratory spaces, and other unique needs. Fire and life safety issues are of utmost importance.

10/30/2013


J. Patrick Banse, PE, LEED AP, Senior mechanical engineer, Smith Seckman Reid, Houston. Courtesy: Smith Seckman ReidRobert Ioanna, PE, LEED AP, Vice president, Syska Hennessy Group, New York City. Courtesy: Syska Hennessy GroupDouglas Lacy, PE, LEED AP BD+C, Senior associate, ccrd partners, Dallas. Courtesy: ccrd partners

Respondents:

J. Patrick Banse, PE, LEED AP, Senior mechanical engineer, Smith Seckman Reid, Houston

Robert Ioanna, PE, LEED AP, Vice president, Syska Hennessy Group, New York City

Douglas Lacy, PE, LEED AP BD+C, Senior associate, ccrd partners, Dallas


CSE: What unique fire suppression systems have you specified in office buildings?

Medical offices, in addition to sharing some of the same needs as conventional office buildings, have specialized needs, such as laboratory areas. Photo: Smith Seckman Reid Inc.Banse: Most office buildings are fully sprinklered, but occasionally a pre-action fire system or a clean agent fire suppression system such as FM-200 is required or requested by a particular tenant.

Ioanna: In addition to traditional wet sprinkler systems, we are seeing a trend toward more clean agent suppression systems, or foam systems and mist-type sprinkler systems that provide better extinguishing capability for the specific hazard present. This is becoming more prevalent in the generator rooms, the fuel oil storage rooms, main distribution frame (MDF)/telecom rooms, and also broadcasting spaces. 

CSE: What unique egress, mass notification systems, or emergency communication systems have you specified into such buildings?

Ioanna: We have designed several buildings using staged evacuation and/or relocation of occupants strategies by deploying in-building fire emergency voice/alarm communications systems (EVACS). This is done for the purpose of notifying and instructing occupants in an emergency. These systems have a one-way emergency communications systems for live voice evacuation messages; and a two-way in-building emergency communication consisting of two-way supervised telephone service for emergency responders and the building’s fire safety team. The fire department communication are designed and installed in accordance with NFPA 72: National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code and operate between a fire command center and elevators, elevator lobbies, emergency and standby power rooms, fire pump rooms, areas of refuge, and inside enclosed exit stairways. We have also specified emergency responder radio systems in certain specialized buildings that require radio coverage for firefighters. Locally in New York City, we have specified auxiliary radio communications systems (ARCS) that provide for an in-building radio system to be installed throughout high-rise and/or large footprint buildings for fire department use. First responder radio coverage must also be evaluated for all new and existing buildings in accordance with the International Fire Code

CSE: What are some important factors to consider when designing a fire and life safety system in an office building? What things often get overlooked?

Banse: I think it is most important to discuss during design and provide for the integration of the BAS and fire alarm systems along with security system. Is there smoke control needed, stair pressurization, should egress locks unlock with or without a delay? Which system actually does the controlling of smoke dampers and HVAC equipment operation during a fire event? Is the HVAC system an active or passive smoke control system? What is the fireman's control panel supposed to do (how much equipment and dampers does it control)? There are so many things to coordinate that if there is little or no coordination provided, something will always be left out.

Ioanna: Pitfalls for owners and managers to watch for:

Assembling the right project team:

  • Hire a professional engineering/consulting firm specializing in the design of fire/life safety systems. Many MEP firms do not have this expertise.
  • Hire a reputable fire alarm contractor (who represents the manufacturer) and an electrical contractor (who performs the installation).
  • Depending on the size of the project, hire a construction manager (CM) or general contractor (GC). A GC will be required for patching, painting, and other related GC work not covered by the fire alarm team or electrical contractors.

During the bid process, consider open-bid, performance-based specification. Note: Your current fire alarm service provider may not be capable of bidding on a newer technology fire alarm system.

  • Owner may need to maintain two fire alarm contractors during the construction phase.
  • Consider non-propriety type systems.

Design considerations:

  • Have the design professional perform a complete building survey and develop a design criteria, deficiency list, and building code/standards analysis. Develop a construction budget.
  • Determine the exact occupancy and use of the building.
  • Determine what type of fire/life safety is required.
  • Contact local landmark and historic preservation commission (HPC).
  • Determine what areas of building will be affected.
  • Obtain pre-approvals from both landmark and HPC and the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ, usually the fire department or building department).
  • Will the building be occupied during the system upgrade?
    • Do we need to keep an active fire alarm system?
    • Can the existing system be off-line?
    • How do you switch systems?
  • Coordinate with all systems (HVAC, elevators, fire protection, security). 

 

CSE: In high-rise office buildings, what type of unique smoke detection/control, elevator lobby, or other fire/life safety systems have you designed?

Banse: On one high-rise office building there were no elevator lobbies included as part of the architectural design, which resulted in implementing elevator shaft pressurization with appropriate points of air injection to minimize smoke migration between floors and allow elevators to safely recall to the appropriate floor. The elevator lobby smoke detectors initiated the system and an area of refuge was designated near the elevators/stairs for rescue purposes



No comments
The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by...
Each year, a panel of Control Engineering editors and industry expert judges select the System Integrator of the Year Award winners.
Control Engineering Leaders Under 40 identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
Learn more about methods used to ensure that the integration between the safety system and the process control...
Adding industrial toughness and reliability to Ethernet eGuide
Technological advances like multiple-in-multiple-out (MIMO) transmitting and receiving
Virtualization advice: 4 ways splitting servers can help manufacturing; Efficient motion controls; Fill the brain drain; Learn from the HART Plant of the Year
Two sides to process safety: Combining human and technical factors in your program; Preparing HMI graphics for migrations; Mechatronics and safety; Engineers' Choice Awards
Detecting security breaches: Forensic invenstigations depend on knowing your networks inside and out; Wireless workers; Opening robotic control; Product exclusive: Robust encoders
The Ask Control Engineering blog covers all aspects of automation, including motors, drives, sensors, motion control, machine control, and embedded systems.
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
News and comments from Control Engineering process industries editor, Peter Welander.
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
This is a blog from the trenches – written by engineers who are implementing and upgrading control systems every day across every industry.
Anthony Baker is a fictitious aggregation of experts from Callisto Integration, providing manufacturing consulting and systems integration.
Integrator Guide

Integrator Guide

Search the online Automation Integrator Guide
 

Create New Listing

Visit the System Integrators page to view past winners of Control Engineering's System Integrator of the Year Award and learn how to enter the competition. You will also find more information on system integrators and Control System Integrators Association.

Case Study Database

Case Study Database

Get more exposure for your case study by uploading it to the Control Engineering case study database, where end-users can identify relevant solutions and explore what the experts are doing to effectively implement a variety of technology and productivity related projects.

These case studies provide examples of how knowledgeable solution providers have used technology, processes and people to create effective and successful implementations in real-world situations. Case studies can be completed by filling out a simple online form where you can outline the project title, abstract, and full story in 1500 words or less; upload photos, videos and a logo.

Click here to visit the Case Study Database and upload your case study.