Working with robots and without enclosures

Ask Control Engineering: What’s going on with collaborative robotics? Collaborative robots work in proximity to humans, often without enclosures. Robots can be retrofit with sensors or designed from the start to operate without enclosures, depending on the application and end effectors used. A number of examples were shown or demonstrated at the Automate 2015 show in March.

07/24/2015


Ask Control Engineering: What's going on with collaborative robotics?

Answer: Collaborative robots work in proximity to humans, often without enclosures to separate people from robots. Robots can be retrofit with sensors and the appropriate programming or designed from the start to operate without enclosures, depending on the application and end effectors. Examples were shown or demonstrated at the Automate 2015 show in March, in Chicago. A few are described below. See photos.

Mitsubishi Electric showed how a robot can reduce risk to human working in the area by using sensors that detect humans within a certain zone. Stepping into the yellow zone slows the robot to safe speed. Going onto the red area stops the robot. One application could be to decrease the number of enclosures and increase floor space.

Mitsubishi Electric showed how a robot can reduce risk to human working in the area by using sensors that detect humans within a certain zone; here, yellow zone is slow; red is stop. This was shown at the Automate 2015 show in March. One application could

Adept Technology showed Adept Lynx autonomous intelligent vehicles (AIVs), considered mobile robots, rather than automated guided vehicles (AGVs), which rely on a stationary path-based guidance system. With mobile robots, on-board intelligence works with location-based technologies, such as machine vision and lasers, for navigation, around humans, objects, and other changes in its environment, while continuing the mission of the Lynx.

Adept Technology showed Adept Lynx autonomous intelligent vehicles (AIVs), considered mobile robots, rather than automated guided vehicles (AGVs), which rely on a stationary path based guidance system. Difference is that on-board intelligence works with l

Universal Robots introduced a third model UR3, a 3 kg robot that uses the same intuitive teach software as the larger payload UR5 (5 kg) and U10 (10 kg), and provides 6 axes of movement for 4 axes of cost. Unlike the two other available models, the UR3 stops with 50 N of force (a finger touch) as opposed to 150 N for the others.

Universal Robots introduced a third model UR3, a 3 kg robot that uses the same intuitive teach software as the larger payload UR5 (5 kg) and U10 (10 kg), and provides 6 axes of movement for 4 axes of cost, at the Automate 2015 show in March. Unlike the ot

Kuka Robotics previewed its new collaborative robot, LBR iiwa, prior to an anticipated June introduction. It will be available in 7 kg and 14 kg versions, and it uses the open source operating system, Sunrise. A medical (all white) version will be ready later in the year, the company said.

Kuka Robotics previewed its new collaborative robot, LBR iiwa, at the Automate 2015 show in March, prior to its June introduction. It is expected to be available in 7 kg and 14 kg versions, and it uses the open source operating system, Sunrise. A medical

Yaskawa Motoman showed its new two-armed BMDA3 collaborative robot, next to a vintage 1986 welding robot (right in the photo). The biomedical robot is intended to duplicate human range of movement from the waste to wrist.

Yaskawa Motoman showed its new two-armed BMDA3 collaborative robot, left, next to a vintage 1986 welding robot, right, at the Automate 2015 show in March. The biomedical robot is intended to duplicate human range of movement from the waste to wrist. Court

- Mark T. Hoske, content manager, CFE Media, Control Engineering, mhoske@cfemedia.com.

ONLINE extra

See the Control Engineering robotics page.



No comments
The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by...
The System Integrator Giants program lists the top 100 system integrators among companies listed in CFE Media's Global System Integrator Database.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
This eGuide illustrates solutions, applications and benefits of machine vision systems.
Learn how to increase device reliability in harsh environments and decrease unplanned system downtime.
This eGuide contains a series of articles and videos that considers theoretical and practical; immediate needs and a look into the future.
Sensor-to-cloud interoperability; PID and digital control efficiency; Alarm management system design; Automotive industry advances
Make Big Data and Industrial Internet of Things work for you, 2017 Engineers' Choice Finalists, Avoid control design pitfalls, Managing IIoT processes
Engineering Leaders Under 40; System integration improving packaging operation; Process sensing; PID velocity; Cybersecurity and functional safety
This article collection contains several articles on the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and how it is transforming manufacturing.

Find and connect with the most suitable service provider for your unique application. Start searching the Global System Integrator Database Now!

SCADA at the junction, Managing risk through maintenance, Moving at the speed of data
Flexible offshore fire protection; Big Data's impact on operations; Bridging the skills gap; Identifying security risks
The digital oilfield: Utilizing Big Data can yield big savings; Virtualization a real solution; Tracking SIS performance
click me