System Integrators

A New Name and a New Look

Welcome to the 1999 edition of Control Engineering's annual directory of automation system integrators. This year we have a new look and a new name—the Automation Integrator Guide. All the best features of the former Automation Register are still here with several improvements to better help you find the engineering services needed for your next project.

By Jane S. Gerold December 15, 1998

Welcome to the 1999 edition of Control Engineering ‘s annual directory of automation system integrators. This year we have a new look and a new name—the Automation Integrator Guide. All the best features of the former Automation Register are still here with several improvements to better help you find the engineering services needed for your next project.

Up front we’ve included a selection of application stories about system integrators and the work they’ve done for clients. An automation system for a new limestone processing facility is described on page 15. On pages 17 through 23 we look at an automated motion control system, an automated assembly machine, a soybean crushing facility, and a cleanroom control system—all engineered by control system integrators. Each story shows what the client hoped to achieve and how the integrator helped them meet specific goals.

Our feature stories also include consulting editor Vance VanDoren’s look at how the latest automation products have simplified the integration process (page 6). Rich Brandon’s annual commentary on the business of independent control system integrators follows (page 13). We at Control Engineering were saddened to learn that this will be Mr. Brandon’s final contribution to our magazine. He passed away on Nov. 19.

1,000 Integrator listings

The directory itself starts on page 24. Here you will find over 1,000 independent system integrators, control consultants, and other automation engineering firms that offer their time, talents, and technology for industrial automation and control projects. Some have funded additional space for details about the industries and areas they serve, their engineering specialties, product experience, and the vendors and professional organizations with which they are affiliated. Many of those corporate affiliations are further highlighted with the vendor’s “seal of approval” at the end of each partner’s listing.

Indexes for each of the above categories follow the listings on page 128. The online Integrator Guide at www.controleng.com/integrator.htm is also searchable by the keywords in these categories. Log on for listing information and hotlinks to dozens of integrator and vendor web sites.

More information

Integrators wishing to be included in the 2000 edition of the Automation Integrator Guide may register online at www.controleng.com/integrator/regform.htm . Vendors wishing to include their system integrator partnership programs in the 2000 edition may contact us directly at controleng@msn.com . Additional information about all 1,000 integrators listed here in the 1999 edition is available from our colleagues at VDI Research. Call 765/497-3367, extension AUTO (2886) for details.

Further coverage of the automation system integration industry will be forthcoming in Control Engineering throughout 1999. In March, we’ll be examining the evolution of system integrators, their changing roles in the automated factory, and developments in system integration methodologies. In August, we’ll be featuring a discussion of automation project justification and specifically when to use a system integrator. And in December we’ll be back again with another edition of the Automation Integrator Guide.

Author Information
Jane S. Gerold, Editorial Director jgerold@cahners.com