Briggs & Stratton reduces electricity consumption by 9.4 million kilowatt-hours

Company uses Orion Energy Systems integrated lighting system, which includes modular high-intensity fluorescent lighting system, wireless control system, and Apollo solar light pipes.
By Control Engineering Staff May 15, 2009

As part of its corporate and social environmental responsibility initiative, Briggs & Stratton Corp. has completed a major lighting retrofit project at its Poplar Bluff, MO, facility that it claims will decrease the company’s electricity consumption by 9.4 million kilowatt-hours a year.
The kilowatt-hour reduction is enough electricity to power 937 homes annually and equates to saving 766,937 gallons of gasoline a year or removing 1,237 cars from the road.
The Briggs & Stratton project entailed replacing inefficient high-intensity discharge lights at eight facilities with Orion Energy System ‘s compact modular high-intensity fluorescent lighting system, which is engineered to reduce energy consumption and associated greenhouse gases. Orion says its patented high-intensity fluorescent lighting platform uses about 50% less energy and provides 50% more light than traditional high-intensity discharge fixtures. Orion systems turn on instantly and operate at a relatively cool 110 °F.
In addition to the lighting retrofit project, Briggs & Stratton claims it has reduced hazardous waste by 90%, eliminated nearly 75%of smog-forming emissions in its engines since 1995, recycles 100% of its aluminum scrap, and all of the cast iron and steel components used in its projects come from recycled materials.
Orion’s energy-efficient technology platform includes its high-intensity fluorescent lighting system, the InteLite wireless control system, and the direct renewable Apollo solar light pipe, all of which are installed as an integrated system in Briggs & Stratton’s Poplar Bluff, facility.
Orion’s integrated system was internationally recognized in December 2008 with the Platts Global Energy Award . The system can reduce energy consumption for lighting in a commercial or industrial facility for up to 10 hours a day during daylight hours when the electric grid is operating at or near peak capacity.

– Edited by David Greenfield , editorial director

Control Engineering News Desk

Register here .