Carbon trading market requires improved infrastructure to curb greenhouse gas emissions

The Bank of New York Mellon report claims the development of a successful global carbon trading market that delivers real and cost-efficient greenhouse gas emission reductions will require an improved market infrastructure to succeed.
By Control Engineering Staff January 20, 2009

New York– The development of a successful global carbon trading market that delivers real and cost-efficient greenhouse gas emission reductions will require an improved market infrastructure, according to a report issued by The Bank of New York Mellon entitled, “Towards a Common Carbon Currency: Exploring the Prospects for Integrated Global Carbon Markets.”

The report–prepared in conjunction with Point Carbon, a provider of market intelligence, forecasting, and advisory services for the energy and environmental markets–finds that for a global carbon trading market to allocate capital to the lowest cost carbon reduction projects worldwide it must be based onstandardization, liquidity, transparency and predictability.

Other

  • Reliable

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  • Consolidation

  • Linking

The paper recognizes the political and practical challenges of reconciling differing worldviews of what constitutes real, permanent and verifiable emissions reductions.
“Creating a more efficient global carbon market by linking global cap and trade programs and continuing the use of international offsets will reduce more greenhouse gas emissions at a faster rate and at a lower cost than would be possible through national or regional programs alone. This recognition, originally embedded in the Kyoto Protocol, needs to remain at the core of a new international framework on climate change,” said Kjell Olav Kristiansen, director of advisory services at Point Carbon.
The paper advocates the development of a linked “cap and trade” market model, in which emitters are offered the widest set of options to reach their emission reduction targets, including the use of imported allowances or offsets.
The paper is available at The Bank of New York Mellon’s website at
www.bnymellon.com/carboncurrency and Point Carbon’s website
www.pointcarbon.com/advisory/newreports
.

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