Chip process cuts power consumption, package size

Analog Devices Inc. (ADI) has introduced a semiconductor manufacturing process combining high-voltage silicon (up to 30-V supply) with submicron CMOS and complementary bipolar technologies. Called industrial CMOS (or iCMOS), the process targets converters, amplifiers, switches, and other devices working in high-voltage factory automation and process control.

By Staff January 1, 2006

Analog Devices Inc. (ADI) has introduced a semiconductor manufacturing process combining high-voltage silicon (up to 30-V supply) with submicron CMOS and complementary bipolar technologies. Called industrial CMOS (or iCMOS), the process targets converters, amplifiers, switches, and other devices working in high-voltage factory automation and process control.

iCMOS analog components operate in electrically noisy environments without the cost of extra ICs needed by other CMOS processes. A key benefit is the process’ ability to fully isolate components—from the substrate or each other—enabling high-voltage switches to be built next to conventional 5-V devices.

Initial iCMOS product introduction included: Single-chip AD5764 that combines four 16-bit digital/analog converters, reportedly in half the size of competing devices; multichannel, 13-bit AD732x and 12-to-16-bit AD765x analog/digital-converters that allow wide software selectable input from; multiplexers dramatically reduce on-resistance.

www.analog.com/iCMOS

Reduce power consumption by up to 85%, package size by 30%

Operate at up to 50 V with optional drain extension

Accommodate multiple voltages on same chip

Tolerate noisy environments without the cost of extra ICs