Despite e-everything, control still core of Hannover Fair

Software, e-commerce, Ethernet, and wireless technologies permeated the air, yet automation and control remained the backbone of Hannover Fair 2000, March 20-25. Attendance was down slightly (4.3%) from last year to 270,000, which was attributed by fair organizer Deutsche Messe AG to removal of the event's lighting technology sector.

By Staff June 1, 2000

Hannover, Germany Software, e-commerce, Ethernet, and wireless technologies permeated the air, yet automation and control remained the backbone of Hannover Fair 2000, March 20-25. Attendance was down slightly (4.3%) from last year to 270,000, which was attributed by fair organizer Deutsche Messe AG to removal of the event’s lighting technology sector. Next year, Hannover Fair will be held April 23-28, its traditional springtime date.

  • Siemens’ Automation & Drives group’s exhibits ranged from software tools (programming, configuration, and simulation), industrial PCs, and soft logic to PLCs, drives, and graphics panels based on Microsoft Windows CE. Distributed architectures for motor starters and I/O systems, along with plant safety solutions also drew attention.

  • ABB ‘s stand concentrated on distribution, control, and quality aspects of power and related technologies. Also prominent was its “World of Medium Voltage,” which showed equipment for process safety and power quality.

  • Schneider Electric ‘s exhibit also stressed themes of power generation and control, for example, low- and medium-voltage energy distribution systems.

  • Bosch Automation Technology’s exhibit ranged over electronic, hydraulic, and pneumatic technologies. Assembly systems, computer numeric controls, programmable controllers, motors, drives, proportional valves, and robotic systems were among specific product offerings.

  • Rockwell Automation ‘s technology themes ranged from motor protection and monitoring to logic modules (ControlLogix and RSLogix 5000) and I/O systems. A product launch was PowerFlex 7000 medium-voltage drive ( CE , Feb. 2000, pp. 85-90).

  • Several GE companies (GE Fanuc, Industrial Systems, Power Controls, and Power Management) combined varied technologies and capabilities into a unified display of power controls. For its part, GE Fanuc highlighted “Process Automation Power” and machine automation.

  • Afcon Control & Automation ‘s latest offering—P-CIM for Windows CE—incorporates wireless, Ethernet, and related elements for SCADA applications. A booth demo, first shown at Hannover, involved speed and direction control of a variable-frequency drive (Schneider Electric’s Altivar 58) via an MS-Windows CE palmtop device.

  • Artesis , one of several Turkish companies at the fair, showed a novel software/hardware tool for maintenance and failure prediction of ac induction motors up to 400 kW. Called MCM (Motor Condition Monitor), this new technology provides the user with five categories of potential motor problems from routine (OK) to serious (Stop).

For more information visit www.hfusa.com . For more Hannover Fair 2000 coverage, see “Daily News” for May 11 at www.controleng.com .