Get actionable greenhouse gas information via energy management module

Software and engineering services combine to monitor, model, and report CO2 emissions to convert energy data into practical greenhouse gas information. Schneider Electric says it has decreased energy consumption by 10% per employee since 2004.
By Control Engineering Staff February 20, 2009

Palatine, IL toring, modeling, and reporting of CO 2 emissions to convert energy data into useful, actionable greenhouse gas information. Schneider Electric claims that through monitoring its own energy and tracking energy performance metrics, the company has been able to decrease its energy consumption by 10% per employee since 2004.
The PowerLogic Ion EEM Emissions Tracking and Reporting module follows guidelines presented by the GHG Protocol for direct and indirect (purchased) GHG emissions. It tracks emissions from combustion boilers, furnaces, vehicles, chemical production or controlled process equipment as well as emissions from an organization’s utilities, such as purchased electricity or steam– those which emit carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) into the atmosphere. Since the indirect emissions result depends on the amount of energy used and the mix of fuel that goes into producing this electricity or steam, the module is said to help delineate direct and indirect emission sources, improve transparency, and assist organizations in implementing their climate policies.
Energy modeling, dimensional analysis, visualization tools
Schneider Electric says the module delivers a customized set of energy modeling, dimensional analysis and visualization tools that deliver actionable intelligence to support a complete energy and emissions management program. Reports include aggregate CO 2 output vs. target vs. base year to track emission reductions project performance and multisource CO 2 output vs. target to compare the emissions performance of various business entities (business units, regions, buildings, facilities, departments, etc). Included in the module is a built-in mechanism that sets effective dates and accounts for the changing relationships between emission factors, purchased commodities, and consumption sources. These slowly changing factors are taken into consideration when calculating emissions outputs and reporting company emissions performance over time.
Emissions data — along with any other data , such as production, energy and temperature — is available for trend analysis and reporting and included in views such as normalized energy usage patterns and key performance indicators.
For more information, visit www.powerlogic.com .
– Edited by David Greenfield , editorial director
Control Engineering News Desk
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