Honeywell receives Department of Energy smart grid grant

Honeywell has been awarded an $11.4-million grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the largest single energy grid modernization investment in U.S. history. One of only four non-utility companies to receive funding, Honeywell will use the grant to support a critical peak pricing response program designed to help commercial and industrial facilities in the Southern California Ediso...
January 1, 2010

Honeywell has been awarded an $11.4-million grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the largest single energy grid modernization investment in U.S. history.

One of only four non-utility companies to receive funding, Honeywell will use the grant to support a critical peak pricing response program designed to help commercial and industrial facilities in the Southern California Edison (SCE) service territory automatically implement energy management strategies to reduce costs and improve efficiency. The program will be implemented to support nearly 700 customers as SCE and other California utilities move to critical peak pricing — a program that offers rate discounts during the summer months to customers who can reduce or shift power during periods of peak electrical consumption.

The new rate structure will see prices spike during periods of peak demand. SCE will send a notice prior to any increase and Honeywell will install technology that allows customers to automate load-shedding strategies that reduce energy use during these periods. Based on open automated demand response standards and powered by Tridium’s Niagara (AX) Framework and JACE controller, the system will receive the utility’s signal, communicate with the facility’s building automation system, and make changes based on parameters the customer sets.

In addition to installing the technology, Honeywell will provide education and engineering services, as well as ongoing support.

Honeywell has also won grants for the research and development of technology that tie into the smart grid. For example, the company is testing solutions that are said to significantly reduce down time and failures for the growing fleet of wind turbines in the United States. Researchers are also developing a controls infrastructure for optimizing renewable energy micro-grids.