Linear motion: Modular spindles make linear motion easier

Mechanical engineers often face the task of converting rotational movements into powerful linear movements. Maxon Motor says that associated development costs now can be cut dramatically by using modular spindle drives in the company’s modular system. The GP 22 S and GP 32 S gearheads can withstand high loads, and the special spindle intake means that customer-specific spindles can be assembled with ease.
By Control Engineering Staff September 27, 2007

Mechanical engineers often face the task of converting rotational movements into powerful linear movements. Maxon Motor says that associated development costs now can be cut dramatically by using modular spindle drives in the company’s modular system. The GP 22 S and GP 32 S gearheads can withstand high loads, and the special spindle intake means that customer-specific spindles can be assembled with ease.

There are three different standard spindle types to choose from: metric spindles, trapeze spindles, and spherical rotating spindles. The units are available in steel or ceramic variations up to 200 mm in length and are supplied with matching spindle nuts.

Gearheads, motors, encoders, and controllers from the company’s standard program are used to drive the spindles. Individual components are all compatible to help create highly effective drive solutions with diameters of 22 mm and 32 mm. Reduction ratios of 3.7:1 to 1,093:1 provide maximum torques of 6 Nm and speeds of up to 1,600 rpm.

Depending on the application, the company’s dc brushed or brushless motors may be used to drive the system. Motors may be fitted with compatible encoders, which is critical for accurate positioning.

C.G. Masi , senior editor