Motion control chip integrates 160 MIPS, 14-bit ADC, and more

Chip-based motor/motion control users gain real benefits from ease of use, small size, and reduced system cost, according to Analog Devices Inc. (ADI, Norwood, MA). Ease of use comes from single-chip integration of CPU performance with ADC (analog-to-digital converter), application-specific peripherals, and other functions.

By Staff January 1, 2003

A 2002 EDITORS’ CHOICE AWARDS WINNER

MOTORS, DRIVES & MOTION CONTROL

Chip-based motor/motion control users gain real benefits from ease of use, small size, and reduced system cost, according to Analog Devices Inc . (ADI, Norwood, MA). Ease of use comes from single-chip integration of CPU performance with ADC (analog-to-digital converter), application-specific peripherals, and other functions. Small device sizes follow without the need for a separate DSP controller, external ADC, and special circuits (e.g., FPGA or ASIC) to implement the encoder and PWM interface functions, explains Finbarr Moynihan, product line manager at ADI. Also, a more integrated solution minimizes the number of external parts needed, reducing system cost.

Analog Devices views progress of chip-based control as having reached the point where very high-performance, mixed-signal ”system-on-a-chip” designs are possible. Dr. Moynihan points to the importance of mixed-signal capability for chip products because sensor inputs in the real world begin as analog data. ”Accuracy to acquire data and perform precise analog-to-digital conversion results in better position determination,” he says.

Single-chip integration with digital control and analog precision is seen in the ADSP-2199x Mixed-Signal DSP Family intended for robotics, servo drives, production machines, and other high-performance motor-control applications. The digital clock runs at 160 MHz in the DSP, despite the high-performance analog-to-digital conversion process, says Dr. Moynihan. ADI’s latest mixed-signal ADSP-2199x chips handle prime motor control and rotor-position-interface functions. ADSP-2199xx family integrates a programmable DSP core, operating at 160 MIPS, with a 14-bit ADC running at 20 megasamples per second, and varioius specialized motor-control peripherals.

www.analog.com/technology/dsp/mixedsignal/index.html

  • Highest-performance, mixed-signal DSP

  • Integrates 160 MHz, ADSP-219x core and 14-bit, 20 MSPS ADC

  • Latest C/C++ development tool support

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