NASA adopts XVL-based applications

NASA has chosen to use Lattice3D and accompanying XVL-based applications for its Digital Shuttle Project.

By Control Engineering Staff March 11, 2004

NASA has chosen to use Lattice3D and accompanying XVL-based applications for its Digital Shuttle Project. Lattice3D technology provides 3-D compression and the ability to publish complex CAD data to the Web and Microsoft Office documents at very high compression rates. The software also allows companies to convert and compress 3-D images into an XVL file, access the data through Lattice3D, then create easy-to-use, visual tools such as 3-D manuals, parts lists, marketing brochures, assembly instructions and parts databases.

A joint effort between two of NASA’s Programs—the Space Shuttle Program Office (SSPO), and the Engineering for Complex Systems Program (ECS)—the Digital Shuttle Project is an ontology-based knowledge management system for a virtual Space Shuttle Orbiter, using intelligent Engineering Objects (eObjs) and immersive 3-D graphics. The eObjs are knowledge collections of entities within the orbiter, including legacy data, engineering data, system behavioral and functional properties, and 3-D graphics models. Using immersive displays covering visual, aural, and tactile input and output, observers will be able to access and interact with the eObjs. Hierarchical component architecture will enable interaction with external processes, such as payload package simulations, to interact with the Digital Shuttle vehicle system and process knowledge base.

—David Greenfield, Editorial Director, Control Engineering, dgreenfield@reedbusiness.com