National Instruments opens first overseas manufacturing plant

Debrecen, Hungary - National Instruments celebrated the official grand opening of its Hungary manufacturing facility March 27 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and reception. Speakers at the ceremony included Victor Orban, prime minister of Hungary; Janet Garvey, charge d'affaires (acting U.S. ambassador to Hungary); Lajos Kosa, Debrecen mayor and Hungarian parliament Member; Dr. James Truchard, NI president and ceo; Ruben Mangin, NI vp of manufacturing; and Laszlo Abraham, managing director for NI Hungary.

By Control Engineering Staff April 2, 2002

Debrecen, Hungary – National Instruments celebrated the official grand opening of its Hungary manufacturing facility March 27 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and reception. Speakers at the ceremony included Victor Orban, prime minister of Hungary; Janet Garvey, charge d’affaires (acting U.S. ambassador to Hungary); Lajos Kosa, Debrecen mayor and Hungarian parliament Member; Dr. James Truchard, NI president and ceo; Ruben Mangin, NI vp of manufacturing; and Laszlo Abraham, managing director for NI Hungary.

‘NI went from breaking ground on the Hungary building to producing products in five months,’ said Ruben Mangin. ‘We stayed on schedule largely because of the great teamwork we had with national and local officials in Hungary. With this new site, we are closer to our European markets, which means we can respond more quickly to customer demand in the region and diversify our manufacturing capabilities.’

NI chose Hungary as the home for its new facility because of its close proximity to NI’s European markets, the well-educated workforce, and the favorable business environment. The 13,400 square meter (144,000 square foot) facility, NI’s first overseas manufacturing site, is located in Debrecen, Hungary and has been operational since October of 2001.

‘With National Instruments coming to Debrecen, the city is one step closer to our goal of becoming the Hungarian Silicon Valley,’ said Lajos Kosa. ‘The relationship that the city of Debrecen has built with NI is an excellent example of the strong community partnerships in Eastern Hungary.’

As part of the grand opening, NI plans to donate its award-winning LabVIEW graphical development software to Hungarian universities. With the NI software, students learn engineering concepts through computer-based learning. NI actively participates in schools and communities worldwide and is already working with universities in Hungary to sponsor school project competitions and internships in addition to the product donations.

NI currently employs more than 100 local workers at the Hungary manufacturing site and plans to double that number by the end of 2002. The manufacturing facility produces computer circuit boards that perform various measurement and automation tasks from the research laboratory to the manufacturing floor.

Control Engineering Daily News DeskGary A. Mintchell, senior editor gmintchell@cahners.com