RFID security breach

The security of a widely used radio frequency identification (RFID) chip has been broken by European researchers. The SANS Institute said researchers at a Dutch university broke the security of the Mifare RFID chip, which is used in the Oyster card, a prepaid smartcard used for travel on public transportation in the United Kingdom.
By Control Engineering Staff August 1, 2008

The security of a widely used radio frequency identification (RFID) chip has been broken by European researchers.

The SANS Institute said researchers at a Dutch university broke the security of the Mifare RFID chip, which is used in the Oyster card, a prepaid smartcard used for travel on public transportation in the United Kingdom. Mifare RFID technology is also used in the UK to access government departments, hospitals and schools, according to the June 24, 2008, edition of SANS NewsBites newsletter.

The research reportedly was presented to the Dutch Parliament, which earlier this year postponed implementation of a prepaid transportation smartcard based on the same technology. The Dutch government is also replacing Mifare cards used to access government buildings, the SANS Institute reported.

www.sans.org