Scientific Web controls deliver data

Engineers can create Web pages for remote monitoring and control of their test and measurement applications, viewable with any browser or operating system, with Measurement Studio 8 from National Instruments.

By Control Engineering Staff May 11, 2006

Engineers can create Web pages for remote monitoring and control of their test and measurement applications, viewable with any browser or operating system, with Measurement Studio 8 from National Instruments . The upgrade delivers scientific Web controls via Microsoft ASP.Net, including a suite of class libraries and controls for acquiring, analyzing and presenting data in applications built using Microsoft Visual Studio . It offers complete integration with Microsoft Visual Studio 2005, new user interface controls, more than 80 new analysis methods, and additional data acquisition code generation.

ASP.Net Web controls let engineers use the complete Microsoft ASP.Net Web infrastructure and their knowledge of C++ or Visual Basic .Net to create test- and control-specific Web pages that include graphs, tanks, switches, and meters. With these new controls, engineers can display data from dynamic sources, such as that from data acquisition devices, benchtop instruments, distributed I/O systems or databases. In addition, Web clients can interact in real time with Measurement Studio applications to control distributed applications, such as those at remote test sites or manufacturing plants.

Integration into Visual Studio 2005 means engineers can select Measurement Studio Web and Windows Forms controls from the Visual Studio Toolbox, edit controls at design time with Visual Studio 2005 smart tags, access Measurement Studio help, quickly add data acquisition and instrument control functionality, and automatically create Measurement Studio Web and Windows projects.

Robert Cornwell, senior program manager at G Systems, says, “We chose Measurement Studio because it provides powerful and highly configurable ASP.Net user interface controls, which are ideal for displaying manufacturing data.”

—Renee Robbins, editorial director, Control Engineering,
renee.robbins@reedbusiness.com