Smart grid meter data management

Ecologic Analytics system delivers IEC 61968-compliant interfaces that also meet NIST and DOE requirements.

By David Greenfield January 6, 2010

Ecologic Analytics, a provider of meterdata management systems for the smart grid, says it is among the firstproviders to deliver a solution with native interfaces based on InternationalElectrotechnical Commission’s (IEC) 61968 Part 9. The interfaces support theNational Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) smart gridinteroperability requirements and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) smart gridinvestment grant (SGIG) obligations. By taking this common information model(CIM)-based approach for its native interface design, the Ecologic MDMS is saidto be directly aligned with the smart grid requirements established by NIST andthe DOE.

Image of a smart meter. Source: Center for American Progress

The Ecologic MDMS CIM-based interfaces adhere tothe recently ratified IEC 61968-9 standard, which is responsible for two distinctareas of application — meter reading and meter control.

The following example illustrates the functionalityprovided by the native MDMS IEC Part 9 interfaces. Using only the meteridentifier, the utility back office system initiates an IEC Part 9-compliantcall to the Ecologic MDMS and remotely performs a demand reset, a remotedisconnect and/or other remote operations. The Ecologic MDMS then fulfills therequest, without the utility back office system needing to understand theidentity of or any of the nuances of the AMI system on which the smart meter ofinterest resides. As a scalable operational hub and point of adjudication forthe enterprise, the Ecologic MDMS brokers these commands and implements thebusiness logic to complete these requests in near real time. Confirmation ofsuccess and validation of results or notification of error conditions are thenreturned to the utility back office system, again using IEC-Part 9-compliantmessages.

Enabling greater efficiency with thestandards-based Ecologic MDMS offers many tangible benefits including:

  • near-real-time analysis of power consumption;
  • support for a wide-variety of energy conservation and peak loadlimiting initiatives through IEC CIM-based messages containing currentprice information, demand-response program and load control information tocustomers in near real time; and
  • optimized smart grid operations that quickly detect power losses, scopethe outage size and location, aid in restoring power and verifyingrestoration activity.

Access other ControlEngineering content related to the smart grid:

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  • Wirelessenergy harvesting: EnOcean Alliance publishes first specification

– Edited by David Greenfield , editorial director
Control Engineering Sustainable Engineering News Desk