Technology expected to play critical role in Obama administration policies

As the federal government transitions to a new administration, technology will emerge as a significant factor in implementing many policy priorities for President-Elect Obama. According to a recent report from Input (an organization focused on helping companies develop federal, state, and local government business and helps public sector organizations achieve specific objectives), the technolog...
By Control Engineering Staff December 1, 2008

As the federal government transitions to a new administration, technology will emerge as a significant factor in implementing many policy priorities for President-Elect Obama. According to a recent report from Input (an organization focused on helping companies develop federal, state, and local government business and helps public sector organizations achieve specific objectives), the technologies expected to receive the most prominent focus under the new administration include information technology (IT) software and technologies that enable sustainability, cyber security, and communication networks. Use of technology, though clearly overshadowed by the economy and other issues, is a consistent theme in Obama’s strategy platform, according to Input. “While the financial crisis will put a strain on agency budgets, Obama’s plans for healthcare, energy, and homeland security have embedded technology requirements that could represent opportunities for the federal technology contracting community,” said Deniece Peterson, principal analyst for Input. Though a wide array of technologies are expected to see a lift due to the new administration’s priorities, the advantage will go to solutions that can help save money, maximize current resources, and increase efficiency, Input noted. Although new programs are likely to be put on the backburner as the Obama administration settles in, the transition effort already underway launches mini-campaigns within agencies to preserve existing programs that could be in danger of the chopping block. “It is critical for federal contractors to start crafting plans for positioning themselves with the new administration if they haven’t already,” said Peterson. “Now that the winner is known, contractors should be performing organizational analysis in key accounts, assessing their technology portfolios, and establishing thought leadership and visibility among potential appointees as they start coming in to their positions,” she urged.

www.input.com