TEDS: Get smarter about plug and play smart sensors, suggests Frost & Sullivan

Despite extensive media coverage as well as publicity from a few renowned sensor and instrument companies, transducer electronic datasheet (TEDS) smart sensors have yet to achieve their expected level of growth and acceptance.
By Control Engineering Staff August 2, 2007

Palo Alto, CA –Despite extensive media coverage as well as publicity from a few renowned sensor and instrument companies, transducer electronic datasheet (TEDS) smart sensors have yet to achieve their expected level of growth and acceptance. Currently, customers do not see their value, and few users have the required software or the electronics to make use of the TEDS information. Due to these challenges, the plug and play smart TEDS sensors market has grown very little, the research firm says.

New analysis from

Frost & Sullivan

World Plug and Play Smart TEDS Sensors Markets

,” says that revenues in this market totaled $27.6 million in 2006, and estimates this to reach $40.9 million in 2013.

“Plug and play smart TEDS sensors made sense for customers using data acquisition systems as they faced many challenges using‘dumb’ sensors,” says Frost & Sullivan senior research analyst V. Sankaranarayanan. “Some of these challenges included set up, tracking, calibration, and knowing what sensor is connected where, particularly in several larger applications.” Typically plug andplay smart TEDS sensors are utilized for large channel counts, Frost & Sullivan says; a vast proportion of the demand for TEDS-based sensors comes from the aerospace and automotive industries as well as universities.

Existing legacy systems thwart the growth of the smart sensors market, Frost & Sullivan says. Convincing end users to employ smart TEDS sensors and the associated data acquisition systems has become a major challenge and poor customer awareness amplifies the problem. Frost & Sullivan says market participants must convince prospective customers of the value of smart sensors by finding solutions that can integrate these sensors with existing legacy systems. This will require a considerable amount of support from the data acquisition system manufacturers.

“A considerable number of end users in the smart sensors market, especially in emerging end-user sectors, are not aware of the benefits offered by smart TEDS sensors,” says Sankaranarayanan. “One of the most important benefits of smart TEDS sensors is the ability to save cost, setup time, and labor,” he adds.

Also read:

Sensor Interface Standard Rides Again

Technology Update: Still more than one way to plug and play

–Edited by

Mark T. Hoske, editor in chief

, Control Engineering

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