The key to worry-free compliance is a nonfinancial e-business audit

Today, an e-business audit can have greater impact on a company than a financial audit. So says nuBridges, which researches changes in legislation that effect e-business. nuBridges also develops solutions that meet and exceed mandates across the retail, manufacturing, health-care, and financial services industries.
By Staff October 1, 2007

Today, an e-business audit can have greater impact on a company than a financial audit.

So says nuBridges , which researches changes in legislation that effect e-business. nuBridges also develops solutions that meet and exceed mandates across the retail, manufacturing, health-care, and financial services industries.

“An e-business audit can make you more money by securing closer connections with your suppliers and customers,” says Tycho Howle, founder and CEO.

“An e-business audit is aimed at finding ways to make it easier for your customers to do business with you.”

—Tycho Howle, CEO, nuBridges

“An e-business audit is aimed at finding ways to make it easier for your customers to do business with you—or locking them in more tightly so they’d rather do business with you than with your competitors.”

The key is assessing the flow of both information, and goods and services.

“The first thing to do is map the information flows that connect you with your customers and suppliers. Then you determine what KPIs [key performance indicators] drive improvements.”

Supply chains hold multiple cost-saving opportunities.

“You might want to look at your supplier on the front end, and your customer on the back end,”says Howle. “It may be a matter of enabling customer orders to be sent directly to the supplier, [whereby the] supplier packages the orders with your label, and ships them directly to the customer.”

The rule is that whatever information is being exchanged, the connections for that exchange should be fluid, tight, and secure.