CNC Motion Control

Understand total system efficiency for motion control

Motion system efficiency, more than induction motor efficiency, also depends on electrical input power, variable frequency drives, gearboxes and transmission elements like chains and belts. Learn more in an Oct. 22 CFE Media and Technology Virtual Training Week course.

By Mark T. Hoske October 18, 2021
Courtesy: Virtual Training Week from CFE Media and Technology, SEW Eurodrive

 

Learning Objectives

  • Virtual Training Week course Oct. 22, archived for a year, thereafter, covers motion system efficiency.
  • Understand the factors that affect total system efficiency.
  • Minimize energy loss in an inductive motor motion control system.

Motion control system components work together to determine total system efficiency, requiring knowledge of electrical input power, variable frequency drives (VFDs), induction motors, gearboxes and transmission elements such as chains and belts, according to Jason Oakley, a corporate trainer at SEW-Eurodrive, U.S. headquarters in Lyman, S.C.

Understanding details related to efficiency help with component selection, system integration and installation, operation, maintenance and other issues through the motion system lifecycle, Oakley explains in an Oct. 22 Virtual Training Week course. A professional development hour (PDH) credit is available for the course, “Understanding Total System Efficiency for Motion Control,” offered by CFE Media and Technology, and available archived for a year.

Energy efficient considerations in motion control systems

Oakley said no single component within a drive system is 100% efficient. Converting some of the intended work output to heat is a necessary evil of any process. However, the amount of heat (wasted energy) created by a process can be minimized through thoughtful and careful selection of individual components.

Much of the industrial energy being consumed by systems is wasted through inefficiency he explained.

Factors that affect total system efficiency, beyond just the motor, including input power, drive components, variable frequency drives, and mechanical connections. It’s important to identify how to minimize energy loss in an inductive motor motion control system.

Energy efficiency of a motion control system includes much more than motor efficiency. Efficiency details also help with component selection, system integration and installation, operation, maintenance and other issues through the system lifecycle, said Jason Oakley, a SEW Eurodrive corporate trainer. Courtesy: Virtual Training Week from CFE Media and Technology, SEW Eurodrive

Energy efficiency of a motion control system includes much more than motor efficiency. Efficiency details also help with component selection, system integration and installation, operation, maintenance and other issues through the system lifecycle, said Jason Oakley, a SEW Eurodrive corporate trainer. Courtesy: Virtual Training Week from CFE Media and Technology, SEW Eurodrive

Examples provided in the course demonstrate lifecycle and asset management considerations for motion control system efficiency.

Learn lessons from other implementations and how to begin. Oakley also reviews principles of power loss, efficiency, system losses, phase angle, loads, power factor, how VFDs affect motion system efficiencies and more.

Mark T. Hoske is content manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media and Technology, mhoske@cfemedia.com.

KEYWORDS: Industrial motion system efficiency, variable frequency drives

CONSIDER THIS

Are you considering all components when optimizing motion system energy efficiency?

ONLINE

https://cfeedu.cfemedia.com/pages/virtual-training-week-fall-2021

https://www.controleng.com/discrete-manufacturing/cnc-motion-control/


Mark T. Hoske
Author Bio: Mark Hoske has been Control Engineering editor/content manager since 1994 and in a leadership role since 1999, covering all major areas: control systems, networking and information systems, control equipment and energy, and system integration, everything that comprises or facilitates the control loop. He has been writing about technology since 1987, writing professionally since 1982, and has a Bachelor of Science in Journalism degree from UW-Madison.