Youth: Name a Mars rover; get your hands on Science Chicago

Fun ways young people can get involved with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) include naming a NASA mars rover and via activities at the Science Chicago Website. See images, details, and links.
By Control Engineering Staff November 27, 2008

Fun ways young people can get involved with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) include naming a NASA mars rover, and via activities at the Science Chicago Website.

Young people can help NASA name a Mars rover.
Name a Mars rover at http://marsrovername.jpl.nasa.gov/

Students from 5 to 18 years old who attend a U.S. school and are enrolled in the current academic year are invited to name the Mars Science Laboratory rover that is scheduled for launch in 2009. To enter the contest, which ends January 25, 2009, students must submit essays explaining why their suggested name for the rover should be chosen.
Votes will be submitted in a worldwide public poll between March 22 and 29, 2009. Nine finalist names will be selected, three from each grade range: K-3, 4-7, and 8-12. Give NASA your feedback by ranking your favorites among the nine candidate names, and help determine the Grand Prize Winner. The winner will be announced on or around April 16, 2009.
For more information, look for the link in the Science Sites for Kids box on the right side of the Science and Technology page .

Learn more about hands-on technology at Science Chicago.
Learn more about hands-on technology at Science Chicago, www.sciencechicago.com

Also, learn Science Chicago brings together more than 80 of the area’s leading academic, scientific, corporate and non-profit institutions to host thousands of programs that provide hands-on learning; spur thoughtful debate; and build enthusiasm for the pursuit of cutting-edge science. Science Chicago aims to help establish the critical value of science and math education at a time when our competitive advantage is at risk. Science Chicago will illustrate that science isn’t just what’s learned in a classroom or lab–it happens all around us and has real impact on our daily lives,” explains Jonathan Fanton, president of the MacArthur Foundation.
Fun science and technology efforts may help fill an anticipated skills gap between the number of students enrolled in STEM curricula and the projected need for jobs calling for talent in those areas.
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