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Machine Safety

Northwestern researchers have developed a device that monitors early signs, disease progression and response to treatment to COVID-19. Courtesy: Northwestern University
Sensors, Vision June 21, 2020

Wearable COVID-19 sensor receives research grant

A Northwestern research team received a $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue developing a novel wearable device and set of algorithms specifically tailored to catch early signs and monitor progression of COVID-19.

By Amanda Morris
A project to develop smart faces masks to assess proper fit and monitor health has received an NSF RAPID grant. Courtesy: Northwestern University
PPE June 18, 2020

Smart COVID-19 PPE mask project receives research grant

Northwestern Engineering researchers received a $200,000 grant from the NSF to develop smart personal protective equipment (PPE) masks embedded with battery-free sensors to assess health for the COVID-19 pandemic.

By Amanda Morris
Courtesy: Inductive Automation
Remote Monitoring June 8, 2020

Top 5 Control Engineering articles June 1-7, 2020

Articles about remote operations, SCADA platform tools, 3D printing, COVID-19 job market impacts. and more were Control Engineering’s five most clicked articles from June 1-7, 2020. Miss something? You can catch up here.

By Keagan Gay
Courtesy: Formlabs/West Virginia University
PPE June 3, 2020

University working with 3D-printing developer to produce swabs for COVID-19 testing

The Innovation Hub at West Virginia University is working with a Massachusetts-based 3D-printing company to produce medical swabs for COVID-19 testing.

By Jake Stump
Courtesy of: Courtesy: CFE Media and Technology
Safety June 2, 2020

Control Engineering hot topics, May 2020

Control Engineering's most clicked articles in May 2020 included stories about the impacts of COVID-19, 3D printed PPE, remote management, advanced controls, IoT, and more. Miss something? You can catch up here.

By Keagan Gay
Courtesy: University of Missouri
Safety June 1, 2020

Top 5 Control Engineering articles May 25-31, 2020

Articles about printing PPE with 3D equipment, high performance HMI, safety precautions to take while trying to reopen due to COVID-19, and more were Control Engineering’s five most clicked articles from May 25-31, 2020. Miss something? You can catch up here.

By Keagan Gay
Courtesy: Cincinnati Incorporated/Steve Rourke, CFE Media and Technology
Safety May 31, 2020

Staying safe in the “new normal” of COVID-19

As companies and manufacturers start to re-open in the near future, health and safety is a top priority.

By Gregory Hale
A team from Northwestern Engineering has found a way to retrofit a common commercial emergency ventilator (Vortran Go2Vent) into a device better suited for COVID-19 patients. Courtesy: Northwestern University
PPE May 27, 2020

Engineers adapt emergency ventilators for COVID-19 patients

Engineers at Northwestern University has found a way to retrofit a common commercial emergency ventilator into a device better-suited for COVID-19 patients.

By Amanda Morris
Engineers from MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have come up with a new approach to sharing ventilators between patients, which they believe could be used as a last resort to treat Covid-19 patients in acute respiratory distress. Courtesy: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Safety May 27, 2020

Engineers propose safer method for sharing ventilators during COVID-19 pandemic

MIT engineers have proposed a suggested design could make it easier to divide air flow for COVID-19 patients in emergencies when no other options are available.

By Anne Trafton
What started as a simple ask from Lake Regional Hospital for 150 face shields quickly snowballed into additional requests from first responders, dentist offices and even U.S. troops serving overseas in Afghanistan. Courtesy: University of Missouri
PPE May 27, 2020

Students printing medical face shields with 3D equipment to fight COVID-19

High school students are using University of Missouri 3D printers to make face shields for health care workers in their area and U.S. soldiers serving in Afghanistan.

By Brian Consiglio