Industrial PCs

Industrial PCs April 1, 1998

National Industrial Automation Show shines at National Manufacturing Week

Expected to draw more than 21,000 visitors and about 215 exhibitors, this year's National Industrial Automation Show (NIAS) may have eclipsed its own expectations. Final attendance figures aren't available yet, but many aisles were jammed during much of the event, especially on March 17 and 18 when control and automation professionals swarmed the south building at McCormick Place, Chicago.

By Staff
Industrial PCs April 1, 1998

cSiemens increases world PC, PLC market share

Following recent gains in market share for its PLCs in Europe, America, and Asia, Siemens currently accounts for 28% of the DM 8 billion world market, according to Hubert Ovenhausen, director of Siemens' Industrial Automation Systems Division. "We attribute our additional profits to the success of the Totally Integrated Automation system introduced last year, wh...

By Staff
Industrial PCs April 1, 1998

Chrysler drives new assembly line with PCs

'We wanted to maximize machine up-time, move away from PLC technology, and greatly reduce floor space requirements for the system," says Chrysler's Kokomo, Ind. plant manager Ken Moore.To meet these requirements, Chrysler chose Cutler-Hammer's (Westville, Ohio) Open Automation Computer, Steeplechase's (Ann Arbor, Mich.

By Staff
Industrial PCs April 1, 1998

Nematron expects growth, seeks president, coo

Nematron's (Ann Arbor, Mich.) growth and new leadership were emphasized during a review of $75 million in major contracts won by the industrial PC-based hardware and software company in a March 17 statement by company officials at National Manufacturing Week here March 16-19.

By Staff
Industrial PCs March 1, 1998

GE Fanuc Buys Rest of AFE Holdings, Forms Integration Team

More than year after buying 70% of AFE Holdings in late 1996, GE Fanuc Automation North America Inc. recently bought the remaining 30% of AFE.A manufacturer of operator interface (OI) and software products with subsidiaries in the U.K., U.S., and Canada, AFE's products are now sold under GE Fanuc's family of Cimplicity OI products.

By Staff
Industrial PCs February 1, 1998

Redundancy in Control

How is redundancy implemented for PC-based control? The first step is defining a physical interface to the real world that will provide multiple computers controlling the same I/O system.One way to provide multiple "controllers" is to implement a "mirroring backup" so that another system also collects all data.

By Gint Burokas
Industrial PCs February 1, 1998

Redundancy in Control

How is redundancy implemented for PC-based control? The first step is defining a physical interface to the real world that will provide multiple computers controlling the same I/O system.One way to provide multiple "controllers" is to implement a "mirroring backup" so that another system also collects all data.

By Gint Burokas
Industrial PCs February 1, 1998

PLCs Aren’t Just Older, ‘They’re Better’

What functionality/features are today's programmable logic controller (PLC) users seeking? How are they applying PLCs? Is any other technology, such as personal computers, taking away market share from PLCs? Control Engineering wanted to know, so we asked a random sampling of 1,500 readers to participate in a survey about today's PLC.

By Staff
Industrial PCs February 1, 1998

Redundancy in Control

How is redundancy implemented for PC-based control? The first step is defining a physical interface to the real world that will provide multiple computers controlling the same I/O system. One way to provide multiple ‘controllers’ is to implement a ‘mirroring backup’ so that another system also collects all data. If the system is controlling in real-time, having more than one CPU in the system is ideal, creating a bumpless control system. This is a common requirement for redundancy. For example, if the CPU fails in a system controlling a furnace, waiting for a replacement might destroy the product.

By Gint Burokas, senior software engineer
Industrial PCs January 1, 1998

Industrial PC

San Jose, Calif.— Contec guarantees hardware support until the year 2006 for its new Box PC, IPC-BX/M400 (PC). This IBM-compatible device is designed for embedding into operating and control equipment. The guaranteed longevity makes it ideal where hardware obsolescence is a concern. It operates on a number of different ac or dc voltages and can be used with flat-panel displays or CRTs.

By Staff