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Data Acquisition

Data Acquisition June 1, 1998

Intelligent I/O subsystem

San Diego, Calif. —Software addressing, optical isolation, RS-485 communications over twisted pairs, and 1.2 to 28.2 kb/sec rates are a few of the features of the remote intelligent data acquisition and control system (RDICS) I/O pods. Each RDICS pod uses ASCII string functions and is remotely programmed from applications such as Basic, C[++], or TurboPascal.

By Staff
Data Acquisition May 1, 1998

OPC Solves the I/O Driver Problem

In factory automation there are many different devices, protocols, and industrial network standards. As a result, each software vendor is responsible for connectivity from automation applications to other vendors' hardware products. An additional complication is that these devices and protocols are always evolving.

By Al Chisholm, OPC Foundation
Data Acquisition May 1, 1998

PC-based control software moves to VBA, NT, OPC

PC-based control software demonstrated its migration toward Microsoft Windows NT, OPC (OLE for Process Control), and Visual Basic, during NMW.Microsoft (Redmond, Wa.) representatives explain more industrial automation software is using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripting, with about 30 companies shipping applications and about 100 companies signed on.

By Staff
Data Acquisition May 1, 1998

Extend DCS Life with In-Place Replacement

Older digital systems, even though fully depreciated, drain the enterprise cash flow because of high operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Much of the true O&M cost is not reported because it involves removing spares from inventory that were valued at the purchase price, not at today's higher replacement cost.

By Lawrence Ricci, Hathaway Industrial Automation
Data Acquisition April 1, 1998

PC-Based Control Goes Real-Time

Personal-computer-based control is one of the fastest growing segments in machine control for monitoring a process and for discrete logic control of processes, such as material handling, machining, grinding, or gaging.Development of Windows NT by Microsoft (Redmond, Wa.) enabled PC-based real-time machine control to become reality.

By Dean J. Petrone and Michael D. Stackhouse, Timken Research
Data Acquisition March 1, 1998

PCI Carrier Board

Wixom, Mich.— Acromag's new APC8620 PCI board interfaces up to five IndustryPack-type ANSI/VITA-4 modules to a PC. By installing analog, digital, and serial I/O modules on the APC8620 carrier card in any combination, users can efficiently develop custom I/O boards with high channel density. Users can also choose from more than 40 Acromag IP modules or hundreds available from third parties.

By Staff
Data Acquisition March 1, 1998

Recorders Offer Something for Everybody

What functionality and/or features are today's recorder users seeking? How are they applying recorders? Are paperless recorders replacing traditional paper recorders? Are ink recorders more popular than thermal recorders? Do people order more single-channel than multichannel recorders?To find out the answers to these and other questions, Control Engineering conducted original market res...

By Staff
Data Acquisition March 1, 1998

May We Have the Envelopes Please

"Control products just keep getting more advanced, yet simpler to use,"was the consensus among editors at Control Engineering when it was time for them to choose the best control products of 1997. For the 11th consecutive year, the editors chose the 50 best products based on three criteria: technological advancement, impact on the market, and service to the industry.

By Michael Drakulich and Henry Morris, Control Engineering
Data Acquisition February 1, 1998

PLCs Aren’t Just Older, ‘They’re Better’

What functionality/features are today's programmable logic controller (PLC) users seeking? How are they applying PLCs? Is any other technology, such as personal computers, taking away market share from PLCs? Control Engineering wanted to know, so we asked a random sampling of 1,500 readers to participate in a survey about today's PLC.

By Staff
Data Acquisition February 1, 1998

Redundancy in Control

How is redundancy implemented for PC-based control? The first step is defining a physical interface to the real world that will provide multiple computers controlling the same I/O system.One way to provide multiple "controllers" is to implement a "mirroring backup" so that another system also collects all data.

By Gint Burokas