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Process Safety

Process Safety September 1, 1998

PLC architecture can provide high safety integrity

There's no safety like nuclear safety. Consequently, process safety instrumented systems (SIS) requiring a high safety integrity level (SIL) can benefit from a programmable logic controller (PLC) architecture used in nuclear safety systems. (See this issue's cover articles for related safety topics.

By Staff
Process Safety August 1, 1998

Sensors get smart

Adding intelligence to sensors is a definite trend in the industry. Not too long ago, users were content with just on/off contacts. Engineers now are eager to implement networks. With machine uptime a critical issue, the ability to implement diagnostics to improve maintenance response is also essential.

By Staff
Process Safety July 1, 1998

Transmitter takes on hazardous duty

Stratford, Conn.— Ashcroft hazardous-duty process transmitters meet various standards for intrinsic safety. Sensors and signal conditioning circuits are interchangeable, making the transmitter upgradable and repairable by the user, which allows changeover on site. It offers 0.25% accuracy, male and female process connections, and a 4-20 mA output.

By Staff
Process Safety July 1, 1998

Enclosures—Think Outside the Box

Considering the globalization trend of industry, a completed control system may be shipped anywhere in the world. To discover what users want and need in enclosures, Control Engineering surveyed 1,500 readers. Of the 465 responses, 50% work in process industries while 39% identified their primary application as discrete product manufacturing.

By Staff
Process Safety July 1, 1998

Copper’s Not the Only Way to Network

You have to install a new manufacturing data network. Before you call for a truck-load of twisted-pair copper wire, better check out all the applications. There may be areas where copper won't work.There are other choices. Fiber-optic technology is not new, but is becoming easier to use. Radio frequency is moving from warehouse data collection to sensors and networking.

By Gary A. Mintchell, Control Engineering
Process Safety May 1, 1998

Honeywell joins U.S. machine safety markets

Honeywell's Micro Switch Division recently entered the machine safety market with a broad product portfolio. The new product families include safety control modules, safety mats, solenoid key-operated safety interlock switches, and a miniature safety interlock switch. Honeywell Micro Switch has supplied safety products in Europe since 1982 and has already adopted Eu...

By Staff
Process Safety May 1, 1998

Industrial networks promote ease of use

Industrial networks proponents at NMW emphasized ease of use and other attributes at exhibits and a concurrent FieldComms International (Mooresville, N.C.) conference.ControlNet International's (Coral Springs, Fla.) Bill Moss explained that industrial users should use ControlNet, rather than Ethernet, including media redundancy, intrinsic safety, determinism, and sch...

By Staff
Process Safety March 1, 1998

High Density IS Modules

Durham, U.K.—Series HiD 2000 provides control system builders with the means to cut the number of cabinets needed for interfacing to hazardous areas. Four channels may be packed into an 18-mm wide plug-in module, compared to the one or two channels common today. Further space savings are gained by the range of termination boards for mounting modules which incorporate loop-disconnect ter...

By Staff
Process Safety March 1, 1998

Recorders Offer Something for Everybody

What functionality and/or features are today's recorder users seeking? How are they applying recorders? Are paperless recorders replacing traditional paper recorders? Are ink recorders more popular than thermal recorders? Do people order more single-channel than multichannel recorders?To find out the answers to these and other questions, Control Engineering conducted original market res...

By Staff
Process Safety February 1, 1998

PLCs Aren’t Just Older, ‘They’re Better’

What functionality/features are today's programmable logic controller (PLC) users seeking? How are they applying PLCs? Is any other technology, such as personal computers, taking away market share from PLCs? Control Engineering wanted to know, so we asked a random sampling of 1,500 readers to participate in a survey about today's PLC.

By Staff