Square root scaling for differential pressure flowmeters

The square root for differential pressure-(DP-) based flow can be taken either in the transmitter or in the controller and its easier to configure the transmitter to take the square root because, on the low end, a very small change in DP results in a large change in flow.

09/18/2017


Courtesy: Cross CompanyInstruments should be ranged to measure not only expected values but all values the system can produce. During upsets, actual values often exceed 20mA values for instruments tightly ranged for normal process conditions. For instruments with linear scale and additional capacity, the fix is simple: increase the 20 mA scale on both the instrument and analog input (AI) in the controller. But nonlinear relationships complicate scale adjustments.

Nonlinear flow measurement

Most methods of flow measurement are nonlinear. Some calculations are always handled inside the transmitter (mag-meters, coriolis, vortex, etc) so that the mA signal is linear to flow for those types of meters. But the most common method of flow measurement is differential pressure (DP) across an obstruction. Regardless of the type of obstruction (orifice plate, Venturi or Pitot tube, etc), the DP is proportional to the square of the flow. Therefore the system must scale flow from the square root of the DP.

The square root for DP-based flow can be taken either in the transmitter or in the controller (but not both). It's easier to configure the transmitter to take the square root because, on the low end, a very small change in DP results in a large change in flow. This makes low flows extra sensitive to electrical noise on the mA signal if the square root is taken in the controller.

Logic for taking the square root in the controller

If it is not feasible to take the square root in the transmitter, and you are writing your own square root scaling logic in a controller instead of checking a square root option in a standard function block, then follow these steps.

First, normalize the signal to 0-1, where 0 is 4 mA, 1 is 20 mA, and 0.5 is 12 mA. The square root then makes sense, as the root of a number >1 is smaller than the number. But the root of a number from 0-1 is larger: √0.5 = 0.707. So if there is a 12 mA signal from the DP cell, that's 50% DP, but 71% flow rate. Multiply the resulting square rooted signal (still 0-1) by the flow scale span to get flow rate in engineering units.

The square root of a negative number is imaginary, and will cause most processors to throw a minor fault and declare the result "Not A Number." To avoid these problems, either clamp negative normalized inputs to zero or square root the absolute value and make it negative again if the original was negative (below 4mA).

Scaling flow to DP from a flow data sheet

Typically, a flow element such an orifice plate or Venturi tube will come with a flow data sheet with expected process conditions and a table of flow rates for various DPs. The only number important for scaling is the highest flow/DP pair on the sheet. For basic scaling, set the range of the DP transmitter from zero at 4mA to the highest DP on the sheet at 20mA. Then in the controller, scale the input from zero at 4mA to that maximum flow at 20mA. If the square root is taken in either the transmitter or controller (but not both), the system will correctly calculate flow through the range of the meter.

Checking scaling and square root configuration

Checking the zero and full span DP, calibrating 4mA and 20mA, and verifying that the controller displays the correct flow at 4mA and 20mA is necessary but insufficient to verify square root configuration. You must also apply one or more of the mid-range DPs from the flow data sheet to the meter and verify that the controller displays the correct flow rate.

Generally, if any mid-range value is correct (along with the zero and maximum), they will all be correct, following the green curve. If a mid-range flow displays significantly lower than it should have (see the magenta line in the chart), the square root may not be implemented anywhere. If it is significantly higher (see the red curve), you may be taking the square root on both ends.

Generally, if any mid-range value is correct (along with the zero and maximum), they will all be correct, following the green curve. If a mid-range flow displays significantly lower than it should have (see the magenta line in the chart), the square root may not be implemented anywhere. If it is significantly higher (see the red curve), you may be taking the square root on both ends. Courtesy: Cross Company

Correcting for process conditions that affect density

A DP meter measures fluid velocity, yielding volumetric flow (GPM, CFM, etc) when multiplied by the cross sectional area of the duct or pipe. Fluid density is irrelevant to that measurement and calculation. Mass flow (#/H, SCFM, etc) is calculated by multiplying volumetric flow by density. For the most accurate mass flow, if any of the nominal process conditions on the flow data sheet differs from actual conditions in a way that significantly affects density, the flow should be compensated.

  • Ideal gases (such as air, natural gas, etc) increase in density linearly with rising pressure and falling temperature.
  • Non-ideal gases (steam) also increase in density with rising pressure and falling temperature, but not linearly, so density values must be determined from tables or curves approximating tables.
  • Liquid density is not significantly affected by changes in pressure but, usually, drops with rising temperature. There are exceptions (water from 32°F to 39°F). There is only a 2% difference in density between water at 39°F and water at 150°F, so differences in that range are probably not worth compensation. However, water at 212°F is 4% less dense than at room temperature, and water at 400°F is 14% less. Therefore, at higher temperatures, a deviation between nominal and actual temperature may be significant enough to compensate. Liquid density versus temperature is almost always nonlinear - look it up from a table or curves approximating a table.

To compensate mass flow for density, use the following logic: 

  • Use a density function block with inputs for all significant parameters (pressure and temperature for gases, or just temperature for liquids). The inside of that block will depend on the type of fluid.
  • Attach nominal conditions from the flow data sheet as constants to an instance of the density block. The result will be "nominal density."
  • Attach actual conditions to another instance of the density block. The result will be "actual density." Conditions ideally are measured with pressure and temperature instruments, but either or both can be entered as constants if that information is not available to the controller.
  • Compensated mass flow = [Raw uncorrected mass flow] x [actual density] ÷ [nominal density].

Increasing the scale

If the actual flow exceeds the maximum scale—even during an upset—you should increase the scale so that these values can also be measured. For a square rooted flow, some math is involved, as DP increases with the square of the flow.

This re-scaling will result in some loss of measurement precision, but, typically, that loss is still far lower than measurement noise and so is not relevant. The hard limit on increasing scale is the limit of the transmitter. Many DP cells for flow measurement are nominally scaled 0-100"WC (inches water column), and the transmitter may be able to measure up to 200" or 300", but no higher.

The simplest way to re-scale is to determine how much more flow is needed, represent that as a multiplier, then square it for the change in DP.

Example: 

  • If 100"WC is 1000 GPM, and you need to measure 1190 GPM, you need 20% more scale, so the multiplier is 1.2.
  • 1.2 x 1000 GPM is 1200 GPM.
  • 1.2² = 1.44, x 100"WC is 144 "WC.
  • You can increase the transmitter range from 100"WC to 144"WC, the controller AI scale from 1000 GPM to 1200 GPM, and the system will still read flow properly.

You can also increase DP by a multiple, then increase the flow scale by the square root of that multiple. This is how to calculate the highest possible flow measurement for a given transmitter limit.

Example: 

  • If the transmitter can measure up to 225"WC, while nominal maximum DP is 100"WC, the DP multiplier is 2.25.
  • √2.25 = 1.5, x 1000 GPM = 1500 GPM.
  • That is the highest flow the DP cell can measure.

<< First < Previous Page 1 Page 2 Next > Last >>

The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by Control Engineering subscribers. Vote now (if qualified)!
The System Integrator Giants program lists the top 100 system integrators among companies listed in CFE Media's Global System Integrator Database.
Each year, a panel of Control Engineering and Plant Engineering editors and industry expert judges select the System Integrator of the Year Award winners in three categories.
This eGuide illustrates solutions, applications and benefits of machine vision systems.
Learn how to increase device reliability in harsh environments and decrease unplanned system downtime.
This eGuide contains a series of articles and videos that considers theoretical and practical; immediate needs and a look into the future.
HMI effectiveness; Distributed I/O; Engineers' Choice Award finalists; System Integrator advice; Inside Machines
Women in engineering; Engineering Leaders Under 40; PID benefits and drawbacks; Ladder logic; Cloud computing
Robotic integration and cloud connections; SCADA and cybersecurity; Motor efficiency standards; Open- and closed-loop control; Augmented reality
Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) represent the logic (decision) part of the control loop of sense, decide, and actuate. As we know, PLCs aren’t the only option for making decisions in a control loop, but they are likely why you’re here.
This digital report explains how motion control advances and solutions can help with machine control, automated control on assembly lines, integration of robotics and automation, and machine safety.
This article collection contains several articles on how advancements in vision system designs, computing power, algorithms, optics, and communications are making machine vision more cost effective than ever before.

Find and connect with the most suitable service provider for your unique application. Start searching the Global System Integrator Database Now!

Control room technology innovation; Practical approaches to corrosion protection; Pipeline regulator revises quality programs
Cloud, mobility, and remote operations; SCADA and contextual mobility; Custom UPS empowering a secure pipeline
Infrastructure for natural gas expansion; Artificial lift methods; Disruptive technology and fugitive gas emissions
Automation Engineer; Wood Group
System Integrator; Cross Integrated Systems Group
Jose S. Vasquez, Jr.
Fire & Life Safety Engineer; Technip USA Inc.
This course focuses on climate analysis, appropriateness of cooling system selection, and combining cooling systems.
This course will help identify and reveal electrical hazards and identify the solutions to implementing and maintaining a safe work environment.
This course explains how maintaining power and communication systems through emergency power-generation systems is critical.
The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by Control Engineering subscribers. Vote now (if qualified)!
The System Integrator Giants program lists the top 100 system integrators among companies listed in CFE Media's Global System Integrator Database.
Each year, a panel of Control Engineering and Plant Engineering editors and industry expert judges select the System Integrator of the Year Award winners in three categories.
This eGuide illustrates solutions, applications and benefits of machine vision systems.
Learn how to increase device reliability in harsh environments and decrease unplanned system downtime.
This eGuide contains a series of articles and videos that considers theoretical and practical; immediate needs and a look into the future.
HMI effectiveness; Distributed I/O; Engineers' Choice Award finalists; System Integrator advice; Inside Machines
Women in engineering; Engineering Leaders Under 40; PID benefits and drawbacks; Ladder logic; Cloud computing
Robotic integration and cloud connections; SCADA and cybersecurity; Motor efficiency standards; Open- and closed-loop control; Augmented reality
Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) represent the logic (decision) part of the control loop of sense, decide, and actuate. As we know, PLCs aren’t the only option for making decisions in a control loop, but they are likely why you’re here.
This digital report explains how motion control advances and solutions can help with machine control, automated control on assembly lines, integration of robotics and automation, and machine safety.
This article collection contains several articles on how advancements in vision system designs, computing power, algorithms, optics, and communications are making machine vision more cost effective than ever before.

Find and connect with the most suitable service provider for your unique application. Start searching the Global System Integrator Database Now!

Control room technology innovation; Practical approaches to corrosion protection; Pipeline regulator revises quality programs
Cloud, mobility, and remote operations; SCADA and contextual mobility; Custom UPS empowering a secure pipeline
Infrastructure for natural gas expansion; Artificial lift methods; Disruptive technology and fugitive gas emissions
Automation Engineer; Wood Group
System Integrator; Cross Integrated Systems Group
Jose S. Vasquez, Jr.
Fire & Life Safety Engineer; Technip USA Inc.
This course focuses on climate analysis, appropriateness of cooling system selection, and combining cooling systems.
This course will help identify and reveal electrical hazards and identify the solutions to implementing and maintaining a safe work environment.
This course explains how maintaining power and communication systems through emergency power-generation systems is critical.
The Engineers' Choice Awards highlight some of the best new control, instrumentation and automation products as chosen by Control Engineering subscribers. Vote now (if qualified)!
The System Integrator Giants program lists the top 100 system integrators among companies listed in CFE Media's Global System Integrator Database.
Each year, a panel of Control Engineering and Plant Engineering editors and industry expert judges select the System Integrator of the Year Award winners in three categories.
This eGuide illustrates solutions, applications and benefits of machine vision systems.
Learn how to increase device reliability in harsh environments and decrease unplanned system downtime.
This eGuide contains a series of articles and videos that considers theoretical and practical; immediate needs and a look into the future.
HMI effectiveness; Distributed I/O; Engineers' Choice Award finalists; System Integrator advice; Inside Machines
Women in engineering; Engineering Leaders Under 40; PID benefits and drawbacks; Ladder logic; Cloud computing
Robotic integration and cloud connections; SCADA and cybersecurity; Motor efficiency standards; Open- and closed-loop control; Augmented reality
Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) represent the logic (decision) part of the control loop of sense, decide, and actuate. As we know, PLCs aren’t the only option for making decisions in a control loop, but they are likely why you’re here.
This digital report explains how motion control advances and solutions can help with machine control, automated control on assembly lines, integration of robotics and automation, and machine safety.
This article collection contains several articles on how advancements in vision system designs, computing power, algorithms, optics, and communications are making machine vision more cost effective than ever before.

Find and connect with the most suitable service provider for your unique application. Start searching the Global System Integrator Database Now!

Control room technology innovation; Practical approaches to corrosion protection; Pipeline regulator revises quality programs
Cloud, mobility, and remote operations; SCADA and contextual mobility; Custom UPS empowering a secure pipeline
Infrastructure for natural gas expansion; Artificial lift methods; Disruptive technology and fugitive gas emissions
Automation Engineer; Wood Group
System Integrator; Cross Integrated Systems Group
Jose S. Vasquez, Jr.
Fire & Life Safety Engineer; Technip USA Inc.
This course focuses on climate analysis, appropriateness of cooling system selection, and combining cooling systems.
This course will help identify and reveal electrical hazards and identify the solutions to implementing and maintaining a safe work environment.
This course explains how maintaining power and communication systems through emergency power-generation systems is critical.
click me