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Energy Efficiency

MD Series High Density Networked Power Metering System with BACnet or Modbus Protocols from Siemens Smart Infrastructure is optimized for use in equipment rooms, multi-family housing, data centers and other high metering load measurement areas. It won a 2020 Engineers’ Choice Award in the Power – Energy, Power Protection category. Courtesy: Siemens
Energy Management February 13, 2020

Three energy meter selection tips

Energy saving designs: Consider how long energy data collection is needed, how many phases and accuracy, and how the data should be collected.

By Drew Knobloch
Safety February 6, 2020

Wearable health tech gets efficiency upgrade

North Carolina State University engineers have demonstrated a flexible device designed to harvest the heat energy from the human body to monitor health.

By Mick Kulikowski
New research by engineers at MIT and elsewhere could lead to batteries that can pack more power per pound and last longer. Courtesy: MIT News
Energy, Power February 4, 2020

Electrode design may lead to more powerful batteries

An MIT research team has devised a lithium metal anode that could improve the longevity and energy density of future batteries.

By David L. Chandler
Courtesy: Chris Vavra, CFE Media and Technology
Power Quality January 31, 2020

Wearable electronics powered by flexible batteries

Stanford University researchers have developed an experimental device designed to provide a comfortable power source for technologies that bends and flexes with the human body.

By Tom Abate
Dr. Matt Pharr is an assistant professor in the J. Mike Walker ’66 Department of Mechanical Engineering at Texas A&M University. Courtesy: Justin Baetge/Texas A&M Engineering Communications
Energy, Power January 24, 2020

Research into next-generation rechargeable batteries supported

The National Science Foundation is supporting Texas A&M researcher Dr. Matt Pharr in his work on developing improved rechargeable batteries.

By Steve Kuhlmann
The controls upgrade to the Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant will include installation of new digital components for all control facilities, an updated and modern control room and robust new protection schemes to help protect against physical and cyberattacks. Courtesy: Burns & McDonnell
Project Management January 23, 2020

Electrical control system and modernization upgrade for power plant

Burns & McDonnell will serve as engineer-procure-construct (EPC) contractor for an electrical control system upgrade and modernization project for the Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant.

By Mary Young
At left, a 3D model by Rice University materials scientists shows a phase boundary as a delithiating lithium iron phosphate cathode undergoes rapid discharge. At right, a cross-section shows the “fingerlike” boundary between iron phosphate (blue) and lithium (red). Rice engineers found that too many intentional defects intended to make batteries better can in fact degrade their performance and endurance. Courtesy: Mesoscale Materials Science Group/Rice University
Energy, Power January 21, 2020

The dangers of pushing batteries too hard

Simulations by Rice University researchers shows too much stress in widely used lithium iron phosphate cathodes can open cracks and quickly degrade batteries.

By Mike Williams
The standard way to test new battery designs is time-consuming and expensive. A new research method from Stanford University, MIT, and the Toyota Research Institute aims to change that. Image courtesy: Chris Vavra, CFE Media
Energy, Power January 12, 2020

Researchers receive grant to enhance solar technology

Texas A&M researchers received $4.4 million to develop and demonstrate a cyber-resilient operation for power distribution systems with massively photovoltaic (PV) generation, such as rooftop solar panels.

By Deana Totzke
An on-skin device designed by engineers at the University of Missouri can achieve around 11 degrees Fahrenheit of cooling to the human body. The device also includes numerous human health care applications such as the ability to monitor blood pressure, electrical activity of the heart and the level of skin hydration. Courtesy: University of Missouri
Sensors, Vision January 9, 2020

Wearable air conditioning device developed to monitor human condition

University of Missouri engineers have developed an on-skin device that functions as wearable air conditioning and has numerous human health care applications such as the ability to monitor blood pressure and body temperature.

By Eric Stann
Courtesy: Chris Vavra, CFE Media
Energy, Power January 5, 2020

Polymer may help Lithium-ion batteries become self-healing, recyclable

Engineers at the University of Illinois have developed a solid polymer-based electrolyte for Lithium-ion batteries that can self-heal after damage.

By Lois Yoksoulian