Workforce Development

Workforce Development December 1, 1998

Flexible career development aids lifetime learning

To successfully manage ever-changing technologies, not to mention their careers, engineers and other technical professionals must "have a clear picture of their company's performance and development expectations for them. They need to see themselves and their performance as others see them," says Jon Younger, managing director and ceo, Novations Group (New York, N.

By Lara Jackson
Workforce Development October 1, 1998

Intelligent Technology Helps Save a Plant

Take a plant that has been in existence since the turn of the century; a plant whose well-focused, small set of products has a strong demand in the marketplace; and one that has a few important, strategic advantages in the marketplace, such as a 100-MW hydroelectric plant. A natural assumption would be this is a plant that has little difficulty being profitable.

By Steven W. Oxman, OXKO Corp.
Workforce Development October 1, 1998

Users Pick Standards

What do Ethernet, PCs, and Micro-soft products have in common?A. They are all commercial computing standards.B. They have changed the way companies manage business data.C. They are changing the way manufacturers manage plant data.D. All of the above.The answer, of course, is D. The past five years have seen enormous changes in automation architectures—changes that would have been un...

By Jane S. Gerold
Workforce Development October 1, 1998

Java Object Technology Can Be Next Process Control Wave

Like a surfer seeking that perfect wave, today's control engineers are searching for the "technology wave" to take their process control systems into the next millennium, and meet mounting information technology (IT) challenges. Control engineers sometimes face their corporate IT counterparts across a chasm of incompatible requirements.

By Robert Atherton, Sun Microsystems
Workforce Development October 1, 1998

Technology hikes productivity, skills lag

Technology investments are improving U.S. manufacturing productivity, but lacking workers' skills and training are holding back the nation's economic performance, according to a recent study by the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)."U.S. manufacturers are investing heavily in technology, particularly information technology, and they've had remarkable results in ...

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

E+H opens U.K. calibration lab

Endress+Hauser recently opened its first calibration laboratory in the U.K., and it's now accepting all types of industrial pressure, temperature, and flow measuring equipment for calibration and repair. The test equipment operates in an environmentally controlled room and provides full traceability to national standards.

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

Safety briefs

Safety cuts across all industries and aspects of control. (See this issue's cover stories for related safety coverage in this edition.) Recent developments include the following:F-R focuses on FDAFisher-Rosemount (F-R, Austin, Tex.)—because of the market importance and complexity of regulation—is spending 90% of its time on FDA-related solutions.

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

ObjectAutomation partners with software, motion control firms

ObjectAutomation (OA) and International Laboratory Corporation (ILC, Hiroshima, Japan) recently formed a partnership in which ILC will develop complementary plug-ins for OA's OAenterprise products. ILC's plug-ins will include LogiPro, a ladder logic programming tool and control engine, and VLinks, a communication server for PLCs and I/O that provides high-speed...

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

Remote controls help run foundry, improve worker safety

How do you operate a foundry's furnace doors and cranes? Very carefully. To make its work even safer, the foundry division of GEC Alsthom (Stamford, England, U.K.) recently chose UK-based Cattron's portable remote control (PRC) systems to operate its furnace doors and overhead cranes that transfer ladles of molten metal.

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

Sensors Expo Excites Senses

Too much of a good thing, even if it's relatively small, can be tough to organize. With this in mind, organizers of Sensors Expo have arranged this year's 35 technical sessions and presentations into four industry-specific tracks and set up a new German pavilion.Now in its 13th year, Sensors Expo will occupy 45,000 ft2 of exhibit space in Hall A at the Rosemont Convention Center (Rosemo...

By Jim Montague, Control Engineering