Adaptive control surpassing PID

The advent of microprocessors and advanced computing platforms has catalyzed the shift to adaptive controllers from proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers in process industries, claims Frost & Sullivan. In its “Continuous Adaptive Control – Technology Developments” report, the research firm notes that adaptive control is increasingly used for its ability to imp...
By Control Engineering Staff May 1, 2008

The advent of microprocessors and advanced computing platforms has catalyzed the shift to adaptive controllers from proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers in process industries, claims Frost & Sullivan. In its “Continuous Adaptive Control– Technology Developments” report, the research firm notes that adaptive control is increasingly used for its ability to improve performance in mechanical and non-mechanical systems.

According to Control Engineering consulting editor Vance VanDoren, “These latest control methodologies offer a means to revolutionize plant and process efficiency, response time, and profitability by allowing a process to be regulated by a form of rule-based artificial intelligence, without human intervention.”

Adaptive controllers evolved from a solution for low-bandwidth applications to serve higher-bandwidth applications such as robots, spacecraft, and complex machining processes, claims the Frost & Sullivan report. Missile control and guidance, fluid drive, industrial process control, power drag, firepower control system, ship navigation, and other nonlinear mechatronic systems now depend on this technology.

Frost & Sullivan research analyst S. Menaka says, “While designing such complex and highly cognitive systems, developers need to be conscious of the time sensitivity of input and output data. Engineers also have to consider other factors such as machine-human interface, ability to create cognitive solutions in a stipulated time, real-time performance control of the system, architecture independence, data normalization, and other such related factors.”

The “Continuous Adaptive Control– Technology Developments” report is part of the Frost & Sullivan’s Technical Insights subscription, which provides analysis of elements involved in the concept, PID controller, and tool path optimization software. It includes techniques of adaptive control such as model reference adaptive control, model-free adaptive control, auto-tuning and self-tuning controllers, applications in domains, and trends.

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