Automation Competency Model finalized

The Automation Federation has completed the Automation Competency Model, a formal federal document defining the skills and competencies needed in the automation field. The Automation Federation worked with industry experts and representatives from the U.S. Department of Labor to develop the model over the course of several meetings.
By Mark Hoske, editor-in-chief February 1, 2009

The Automation Federation has completed the Automation Competency Model, a formal federal document defining the skills and competencies needed in the automation field. The Automation Federation worked with industry experts and representatives from the U.S. Department of Labor to develop the model over the course of several meetings.

The organization explained that a competency model describes the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to perform well in an occupation. The Automation Competency Model is made up of nine tiers, including personal effectiveness, academic, workplace, automation, occupation-specific technical, management, and industry-wide competencies.

Designed to help individuals prepare for job opportunities in the automation profession, the model will also help academic institutions updating curricula to better prepare the technology workforce of the future. Most importantly, it will provide a common language for the dialogue between the educators and executives who are working together to rebuild the workforce pipeline, which should lay a framework for filling the skills gap in controls and automation.

“Completion of the Automation Competency Model is a huge step in our workforce development efforts to develop the next generation of automation professionals,” said Automation Federation chairman Steve Huffman. “The next step is for automation professionals, companies, and other organizations to help to spread this model throughout the United States.”

The Automation Federation describes itself as a global umbrella organization under which member associations and societies engaged in manufacturing and process automation activities can work more effectively to fulfill their missions, advance the science and engineering of automation technologies and applications, and develop the workforce needed to capitalize on the benefits of automation.

www.automationfederation.org