CIP Motion: Advantages touted versus time-slotted motion networks

Dispelling perceived myths about motion networks was part of the ODVA 2007 CIP Networks Conference and 12th Annual meeting. Find out if you’re operating on myths or truths, based on four key points.

By Control Engineering Staff September 27, 2007

Dispelling perceived myths about motion networks was part of the ODVA 2007 CIP Networks Conference and 12thAnnual meeting. Find out if you’re operating on myths or truths, based on four key points.

CIP Motion:

1. Uses standard unmodified Ethernet, suitable for almost all motion control applications, in a deterministic, open environment;

2. Is not bound by same limits found in traditional motion control networking solutions;

3. Allows multiple drive and control types; and

4. Integrates with other CIP networks.

“Not using a dedicated motion control network saves significant lifecycle implementation costs,” says Steven A. Zuponcic, chairman of the Distributed Motion Joint Special Interest Group, and application engineering manager, field marketing services, Rockwell Automation . “The 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet offers real time in software to 100 milliseconds; with hardware for IEEE-1588 time synchronization, 100 nanosecond speed is possible,” he says.

Further, because the CIP-based network doesn’t reserve time slots at certain times, it’s more flexible. The time stamp, he says, provides ability to add or remove drives, change drive configuration, and get added diagnostic or status data from drives during runtime.

Learn more about CIP Motion at the ODVA Website.

Also read: ODVA family meets: DeviceNet, EtherNet/IP, CompoNet, CIP Safety, others.

www.controleng.com/article/CA6478551.htm

— Mark T. Hoske , editor in chief, Control Engineering

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