Helmet technology demonstrated using compact data acquisition system

At NIWeek 2014, Dr. John Lloyd demonstrated his prototype helmet technology, which is designed to cut rotational impact forces by 50% and reduce the potential for a concussion for the wearer. The test stand was demonstrated at the 20th annual National Instruments conference and show in Austin, Texas. (Link to related news below.)
By CFE Media August 5, 2014

Figure 1: The prototype helmet technology by Lloyd Industries is designed to cut rotational impact forces by 50% and reduce the potential for a concussion for the wearer. Image courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, Control EngineeringDr. John Lloyd of Lloyd Industries demonstrated his prototype helmet technology at NIWeek 2014 at the Austin Convention Center. Lloyd, a board-certified ergonomist, has developed a helmet that is designed to cut rotational impact forces by 50%, which could reduce the risk for a concussion.

Concussions, particularly in football, have become a big story in recent years as researchers have found links between people who have endured repeated head trauma and concussions to neurological diseases, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer’s. Recent suicides by high-profile NFL players as well as the subsequent brain autopsies on players have brought increased safety concerns for people-particularly children-who play the game of football, as well as other contact sports.

Lloyd demonstrated how his helmet works by using a 1,000-lb impact test (about 14 mph) on stage with a helmet prototype and a National Instruments cDAQ-9178 controller. The CompactDAQ line of data acquisition is designed to withstand shock and vibration in harsh environments. Lloyd said rotational force currently isn’t measured for football helmets in concussion and brain damage discussions.

Figure 2: Dr. John Lloyd is a board-certified ergonomist. He demonstrated his helmet at NIWeek 2014. Image courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, Control EngineeringFigure 3: Lloyd demonstrated how his helmet works by using a 1,000-lb impact test (about 14 mph) on stage with a helmet prototype and a National Instruments cDAQ-9178 controller. Image courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, Control Engineering

In addition to sports, the helmets and the Newtonian technology that is being used in the helmet design could also be applied to medical flooring, such as hospitals or nursing homes, and vehicle interiors, he suggested.

– Edited by CFE Media. See more Control Engineering machine safety stories.

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Learn more about the controller used in the NIWeek demonstration below.

Lloyd Industries Inc.

http://drbiomechanics.com/