CNC, Motion Control

Many-core principles even extend to DIN rail-mountable machine controllers, such as this Beckhoff CX2042 Embedded PC. Courtesy: Beckhoff Automation
Industrial PCs January 13, 2020

Many-core technology fills in the blanks for advanced machine control

Cover Story: As machines incorporate more complex components and software, many-core industrial PCs (IPCs) offer the processing and core isolation capabilities to realize smart factory and Industry 4.0 concepts. How many cores do certain applications need?

By Eric Reiner
BayCIX, an IT systems and service provider in Landshut, Germany, suggested that Loibl Förderanlagen used SEH Technology devices to communicate to a Messer steel-cutting machine and eliminate outdated PC-based operating system software with a virtualization design. Courtesy: SEH Computertechnik GmbH
Virtualization, Cloud Analytics January 2, 2020

Machine retrofit: Network, virtualization

An industrial conveyor manufacturer needed to put computer-aided design (CAD) software into the cloud, eliminate outdated Microsoft Windows 7 PC software, and keep a steel cutter with RS-232 communications connected to receive CAD outputs. See two virtualization obstacles.

By Jeorg Hecke
CNC Motion Control December 10, 2019

Seven things to know about OMAC

The Organization for Machine Automation and Control (OMAC) assembles end-user manufacturers, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) machine builders, system integrators, technology providers, and non-profit and government agency organizations to address key issues, such as connectivity, manufacturing efficiency and best practices for global manufacturing.

By John Kowal
Courtesy: CFE Media
CNC Motion Control December 10, 2019

Motion control, motor sales increase slightly in Q3 2019

TheMotion Control & Motor Association (MCMA) reported that global motion control and motor suppliers have received orders at $2.65 billion through the third quarter of 2019.

By Association for Advancing Automation (A3)
University of Wisconsin assistant professor Xiangru Xu believes the trend of autonomous systems will continue growing rapidly. Courtesy: University of Wisconsin
AI and Machine Learning December 6, 2019

Researchers making autonomous systems safer for challenging applications

A researcher at the University of Wisconsin is developing better control algorithms for autonomous systems that provide safety guarantees while maintaining those systems’ performance.

By Adam Malecek
Courtesy: CFE Media and Technology, EASA
Motors, Drives December 5, 2019

Your questions answered: Right-sizing pumps with variable speed drives

Webcast presenter Eugene Vogel answered questions on variable speed drives (VSDs), variable frequency drives (VFDs), and their value for manufacturers.

By Eugene Vogel
Courtesy: Chris Vavra, CFE Media
Sensors, Vision November 17, 2019

Machine vision and AI enhance 3-D printing

Adding machine vision and artificial intelligence (AI) to 3-D printing allows industrial printers to produce products that have never been printed before.

By AIA
Using the researchers' path planning algorithm, complex paths that typically take 15 to 30 minutes to specify manually can be generated in just a few seconds, bringing the tool from from source to destination to complete manufacturing tasks without human help. Courtesy: Pradeep Rajendran, USC Viterbi
Robotics November 16, 2019

Algorithm developed to help automate robots for more complex workspaces

Researchers at the USC Viterbi Center for Advanced Manufacturing have identified an algorithm designed to provide robots short, collision-free solutions in complex manufacturing spaces.

By Avni Shah
Figure 1: Packaging lines benefit from the increased controllability of electromechanical actuators as they often eliminate the need for changeover when switching from one product to another. Courtesy: Thomson Industries Inc.
Sensors, Actuators November 12, 2019

Eight selection criteria for actuation components

Electromechanical systems offer advantages over hydraulic and pneumatic actuators

By Chad Carlberg and Chris Diak
For last-mile delivery, robots of the future may use a new MIT algorithm to find the front door, using clues in their environment. Courtesy: MIT News
Robotics November 9, 2019

Technique helps robots find the front door

MIT engineers, along with the Ford Motor Company, have developed a navigation method for robots that enables a robot to use clues in its environment to plan out a route to its destination, which can be described in general semantic terms rather than coordinates on a map.

By Jennifer Chu