Workforce Development May 22, 2019

Control Engineering Career and Salary Survey, 2019

Engineers are getting paid more, although fewer expect to get increases in 2019; top factors for determining job satisfaction are feeling of accomplishment, technical challenge, and financial compensation.

By Mark T. Hoske and Amanda Pelliccione
Workforce Development May 22, 2019

Research: More skilled workers are needed; outsourcing, STEM initiatives may help

Think Again: The 2019 Control Engineering Career and Salary Survey includes questions on topics of concern, such as outsourcing, workforce, process improvement, cybersecurity, automation, and threats.

By Mark T. Hoske
Robotics May 23, 2019

Smart robotic system developed to sniff out pollution and toxic leaks

Duke University researchers are using the physics of airflows to locate gaseous leaks more quickly in complex scenarios for processing and chemical applications. See video.

By Ken Kingery
Workforce Development May 22, 2019

Continue education, improve attitude, use engineering tips, communicate effectively

Career update: Top areas of advice offer by respondents to the 2019 Career and salary survey from Control Engineering, CFE Media and Technology, are education, attitude, engineering tips, and communications.

By Mark T. Hoske and Amanda Pelliccione
Business of Engineering May 23, 2019

How to retain and recall what you read

Follow these three steps to remember what you’ve read or learned.

By Syed Peeran, Ph.D., PE, Boston
Recent Content
For a standard turbine fan such as the diagram shows here, a typical simulation would only include sections S1, R2 and S2. New research from the GUIde 6 Consortium is now showing that including R3 is important to the accuracy of the simulations. Courtesy: Shreyas Hegde/Duke University
Simulators, Optimizers May 26, 2019

Guiding vibration simulations for turbines

The Duke-led GUIde Consortium develops faster, more accurate simulations of turbine blade vibrations to help aeronautical engineers develop safer jet turbines with lower maintenance costs.

By Ken Kingery
Scientists at the Army Research Lab (ARL) and Towson University may have identified a way to improve the cybersecurity of distributed network intrusion detection. Courtesy: U.S. Army Illustration/ISSSource
Cybersecurity May 25, 2019

Method developed to detect cyber attacks with compressed network traffic

Researchers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Towson University are developing a method on compressing network traffic as much as possible without losing the ability to detect and investigate malicious activity.

By Gregory Hale
A Hall-bar device structure (see inset) is wire-bonded to a 16-pin chip-carrier. The chip-carrier allows for extensive electrical characterization of the device at both low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Courtesy: Min Sup Choi/Columbia Engineering
Electrical, Power May 25, 2019

Fabrication platform produces pristine 2-D transistors

Columbia University engineers have developed a clean, damage-free fabrication process that creates pristine transistors made from 2-D material stacks.

By Holly Evarts
Courtesy: CFE Media
Sensors, Vision May 24, 2019

Embedded vision systems improve virtual reality

Embedded vision systems are being used to track human eye movements and determining, which is improving virtual reality (VR) applications.

By AIA
Courtesy: Chris Vavra, CFE Media
Industrial PCs May 24, 2019

Research examines computer software code understanding and documentation

A team of researchers at Texas A&M University looked at the best way to document computer code by using samples and found that good naming, and comment were more important than good documentation.

By Lorian Dusek
Courtesy: FieldComm Group
Other Networks May 24, 2019

Nominees being accepted for Plant of the Year award

The FieldComm Group is seeking qualified end users and manufacturers for the 16th annual Plant of the Year Award. Nominations will be accepted until May 31, 2019.

By FieldComm Group
A scene from the Rice University campus captured with the TuLIPSS spectrometer provides spectral signatures that can be filtered for many purposes. The system allows data to be gathered in an instant for environmental or biological analysis. Courtesy: Modern Optical Instrumentation and Bio-Imaging Laboratory/Rice University
Sensors, Vision May 24, 2019

Researchers develop portable hyperspectral camera for imaging, research applications

Rice University engineers are building a portable hyperspectral camera, Tunable Light-Guide Image Processing Snapshot Spectrometer (TuLIPSS), which allows researchers to instantly capture data across the visible and near-infrared spectrum.

By Mike Williams