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Machine Safety

Machine Safety January 1, 1998

Connect to the Benefits of Digital Industrial Networks

More users, system integrators, and manufacturers of control hardware and software are realizing the benefits of digital networks at the sensor, device, and fieldbus levels.In this kickoff of the "Year of the Network" series, Control Engineering asked leaders associated with 12 major industrial networks to reveal growth projections, ideal applications, views on standards, and future out...

By Mark T. Hoske, Control Engineering
Machine Safety July 1, 1997

Intrinsic safety protects your plant against explosions

Explosions can be prevented by limiting the amount of electrical energy available in hazardous areas or by containing the situation using bulky, heavy devices called ‘explosion-proof enclosures.’ Limiting excess electrical parameters such as voltage and amperage (current) requires the use of energy-limiting devices known as ‘intrinsically safe (IS) barriers.’ Explosion-proof enclosures prevent or control explosive situations with brute force. They are heavy containers designed to hold an explosion inside. Electrical devices within explosion-proof enclosures can operate at normal power levels.

By Henry M. Morris
Machine Safety January 1, 1970

Analyzing, tracking process hazards

Regulatory compliance is driving industry to provide more complete information concerning its manufacturing processes and systems partially because many process industries either use hazardous feedstock or produce hazardous materials. To ensure safe operation of these facilities, OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) rules (29 CFR 1910.

By Staff
Machine Safety January 1, 1970

Ethernet Security, Safety Relies on Common Sense Networking

KEY WORDS Networks and communication Ethernet Internet and intranet PC-based control Device-level networksThe price of freedom? A little less freedom. More users are seeking to gain Ethernet's interoperability and flexibility. However, the relatively greater openness of Ethernet can mean increased network vulnerability, especially when networks are linked via the Internet.

By Jim Montague, CONTROL ENGINEERING