Sensors, Actuators

Sensors, Actuators August 1, 1998

Four-channel pressure sensors

Schaumburg, Ill.— The E8M line of pressure sensors is available in positive, negative, and differential pressure. The cylindrical positive and negative devices measure 1.08 × 1.22 × 1.48 in., while the differential version measures 1.69 × 1.02 × 0.75 in. The extremely compact sensors are also lightweight, making them ideal for installation on robot arms and other movi...

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators June 1, 1998

New chip for pressure sensors

Milpitas, Calif. —UltraStable silicon micromachined chip has increased the performance over a broader temperature range of the TO-8 Series pressure sensors. Temperature errors are improved to 0.5% full scale output over a range of –20 to +85 °C. These solid-state piezoresistive pressure sensors are available in 6- and 8-pin packages and standard ranges of 0-15 and 0-250 psi.

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators June 1, 1998

Dual-scale control for batching system

Rice Lake, Wis. —CB-1 concrete batch controller provides dual-scale control in a single automated concrete batching system. Two weight indicators—one for each hopper—gather weight data used to control the release of four separate aggregates and two cements. The system also controls water addition and six admixtures by monitoring a pulse from a flowmeter.

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators June 1, 1998

Contact Sensors: The Business End of Temperature Measurement

This is the third installment of a five-part series on Process Sensing. Pressure sensing appeared in March. Smart sensors appeared in May. Other articles include flow measurement (September) and level sensing (November).Unsung. Unremarked. Easily forgotten but definitely indispensable. They come in a myriad of sizes and packages.

By Dick Johnson, Control Engineering
Sensors, Actuators May 1, 1998

HART temperature transmitter added

Warminster, Pa.— The EBTH is an addition to the Bailey-Fischer & Porter HART family of transmitters and is interchangable with the EQS transmitter. Inputs include RTD, thermocouple, millivolt, and ohms. The user-configured output can be linear with respect to a selected temperature span, or follow a user-programmed function generator.

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators May 1, 1998

Electronic gas flowmeter

Georgetown, Tex. —Model 310 Gas Flo-meter features both an LED bar graph display and an LCD digital readout. The 2.5-in tall bar graph meter is visible from up to 20 ft. Model 310 is designed to measure gas flow rates from 10 ml/min to 200 liters/min over several ranges with an accuracy of ±3% full scale.

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators May 1, 1998

Flush-mount transmitter

Phoenix, Ariz.— Series 900 Smart Pressure Transmitters feature flush mounting for applications where clogging is often a problem. According to the manufacturer, the flush-mount devices are suited for use in pulp and paper operations. They are also intended for applications that involve slurries, suspended solids, or materials that may crystallize, polymerize, or precipitate.

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators May 1, 1998

Process Control Goes ‘Off to See the Wizard’

This is the second installment of a five-part series on Process Sensing. Pressure sensing appeared in March. Others include temperature sensing (June), flow measurement (September), and level sensing (November).If you really want to stir up some controversy in the control room or up in the engineering department, get on the subject of smart sensors.

By Dick Johnson, Control Engineering
Sensors, Actuators May 1, 1998

Smart level transmitter

Horsham, Pa. —SLT II is an RF/Admittance smart level transmitter incorporating Honeywell's Digitally Enhanced protocol. Released by Drexelbrook Engineering Co., the new design features upgraded software and a new housing. The electronics can be mounted integrally with the sensor or remotely from the sensor.

By Staff
Sensors, Actuators April 1, 1998

Smart actuator, positioner installations increase

More users worldwide are installing smart actuators and positioners as they realize their higher-level controls need increasingly consistent valve performance. This new emphasis is pushing valves to become more fully integrated into users' digital control systems, according to Automation Research Corp.

By Staff