Workforce Development

Workforce Development September 1, 1998

ObjectAutomation partners with software, motion control firms

ObjectAutomation (OA) and International Laboratory Corporation (ILC, Hiroshima, Japan) recently formed a partnership in which ILC will develop complementary plug-ins for OA's OAenterprise products. ILC's plug-ins will include LogiPro, a ladder logic programming tool and control engine, and VLinks, a communication server for PLCs and I/O that provides high-speed...

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

Remote controls help run foundry, improve worker safety

How do you operate a foundry's furnace doors and cranes? Very carefully. To make its work even safer, the foundry division of GEC Alsthom (Stamford, England, U.K.) recently chose UK-based Cattron's portable remote control (PRC) systems to operate its furnace doors and overhead cranes that transfer ladles of molten metal.

By Staff
Workforce Development September 1, 1998

Sensors Expo Excites Senses

Too much of a good thing, even if it's relatively small, can be tough to organize. With this in mind, organizers of Sensors Expo have arranged this year's 35 technical sessions and presentations into four industry-specific tracks and set up a new German pavilion.Now in its 13th year, Sensors Expo will occupy 45,000 ft2 of exhibit space in Hall A at the Rosemont Convention Center (Rosemo...

By Jim Montague, Control Engineering
Workforce Development August 1, 1998

AMP to eliminate 3,500 jobs, close three plants

Slackening sales, increasing competition, and other financial pressures forced AMP Inc. to announce July 17 that it will cut 3,500 employees worldwide, furlough its 22,000 U.S. staffers for a week this summer, close three plants, and transfer some product lines. Personnel will be cut through layoffs, early retirement, and attrition.

By Staff
Workforce Development August 1, 1998

Rockwell Automation splits into two units; will lay off 3,000

To compete globally, cut costs, and develop new products faster, Rockwell Automation is being reorganized into two units and will lay off 3,000 employees over the next year. This news followed a June 29 announcement of several company-wide restructuring projects by Rockwell Automation's parent, Rockwell International Corp.

By Staff
Workforce Development August 1, 1998

Battling the Obsolescence Blues

Here's a scary thought. If you received your engineering degree prior to 1991, half of what you learned about your field is now obsolete. If you work in software development, it's even more bleak. Your expertise has a half-life of about two years, which means all but the most recent graduates are out-of-date.

By Jane S. Gerold
Workforce Development July 1, 1998

Translate web-based info

The World Wide Web connects computers from around the planet for sharing information. With web technology, a person in one corner of the world can access a page hosted on a server on the opposite side of the globe. But will that person be able to read the page?While the web is global in scale, most of its content is in English.

By Matt Bellm
Workforce Development July 1, 1998

USDATA’s new MES debuts at Microsoft

In a telecast from Microsoft Studios, USDATA (Richardson, Tex.) introduced its new Xfactory manufacturing execution system (MES) on June 8. The announcement was made by Bob Merry, USDATA's president and ceo, and Charles Stevens, vice president of Microsoft's Application Developers Customer Unit.

By Staff
Workforce Development July 1, 1998

Corrections – 1998-07-01

Three column headings were mislabeled on the "Humans, PCs Shift Division of Labor" chart in the "Human element gains importance in enterprise integration" article on p. 21 in the June 1998 issue of Control Engineering. The mislabeling switched the "% of decisions by computers" heading with the "% of decisions by computers" heading, reversed the chart's actual findings, and made the "Pro...

By Staff
Workforce Development July 1, 1998

Instruments may lose steam despite GDP growth in 1Q98

Is it time to cool off? Though the nation's GDP grew 4.2% during 1Q98, the U.S. Commerce Department says the manufacturing sector is showing some signs of slower growth. This suggests overall GDP gains will likely moderate during the rest of 1998.Manufacturing sector production expanded by 1.8% during 1Q98—down sharply from its 8.

By Daryl Delano